The influence of cognitive burden, chronic stress, and somatic symptoms on depressive symptoms after brain injury

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156280
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The influence of cognitive burden, chronic stress, and somatic symptoms on depressive symptoms after brain injury
Abstract:
The influence of cognitive burden, chronic stress, and somatic symptoms on depressive symptoms after brain injury
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Bay, Esther H., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Jacobus Donders, PhD
[Research Presentation] Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant international concern, with 1.5 million new cases of brain injury occurring annually in the US and rising epidemic proportions in the world.áNearly 77% of those who sustain traumatic brain injury will experience depression.áThis cross-sectional study is guided by McEwenÆs theory of stress allostasis and examined to what extent chronic stress, cognitive burden and somatic symptoms explained post-TBI depressive symptoms. Eighty-four community dwelling persons who sustained a mild-to-moderate TBI and were evaluated in an outpatient rehabilitation setting participated in this study.áThree hypotheses were tested:áCognitive burden is negatively related to depressive symptoms. Chronic stress is positively related to depressive symptoms. Somatic symptoms are positively related to depressive symptoms. Measures included: IMPACT, a computerized cognitive battery (IMPACT), Perceived Stress and the Impact of Event Scales, the Fatigue Impact and McGill Pain Scales, the Neurobehavioral Functioning Inventory, and a brain injury symptom score.áIn person data collection was conducted.áThose participating were ages 18-60, equally balanced for severity of injury and gender and between 1-38 months from their injury date.áMultiple regression analysis revealed that only verbal memory and reaction time on the IMPACT significantly predicted depressive symptoms.áSixty-nine percent of the variance in depressive symptoms was explained by perceived and event-related chronic stress, pain, brain injury symptoms, and income level.áSurprisingly, cognitive burden was not significant in the final regression models. These results indicate that for community dwelling persons without severe TBI who were evaluated and treated in outpatient clinics, they are still experiencing significant levels of chronic stress which predicts their depression levels.áGiven that these persons are on average within 15 months from their date of injury, it is critical that interventions towards stress management be targeted earlier to attenuate depression levels.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe influence of cognitive burden, chronic stress, and somatic symptoms on depressive symptoms after brain injuryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156280-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The influence of cognitive burden, chronic stress, and somatic symptoms on depressive symptoms after brain injury</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bay, Esther H., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">baye@msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jacobus Donders, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant international concern, with 1.5 million new cases of brain injury occurring annually in the US and rising epidemic proportions in the world.&aacute;Nearly 77% of those who sustain traumatic brain injury will experience depression.&aacute;This cross-sectional study is guided by McEwen&AElig;s theory of stress allostasis and examined to what extent chronic stress, cognitive burden and somatic symptoms explained post-TBI depressive symptoms. Eighty-four community dwelling persons who sustained a mild-to-moderate TBI and were evaluated in an outpatient rehabilitation setting participated in this study.&aacute;Three hypotheses were tested:&aacute;Cognitive burden is negatively related to depressive symptoms. Chronic stress is positively related to depressive symptoms. Somatic symptoms are positively related to depressive symptoms. Measures included: IMPACT, a computerized cognitive battery (IMPACT), Perceived Stress and the Impact of Event Scales, the Fatigue Impact and McGill Pain Scales, the Neurobehavioral Functioning Inventory, and a brain injury symptom score.&aacute;In person data collection was conducted.&aacute;Those participating were ages 18-60, equally balanced for severity of injury and gender and between 1-38 months from their injury date.&aacute;Multiple regression analysis revealed that only verbal memory and reaction time on the IMPACT significantly predicted depressive symptoms.&aacute;Sixty-nine percent of the variance in depressive symptoms was explained by perceived and event-related chronic stress, pain, brain injury symptoms, and income level.&aacute;Surprisingly, cognitive burden was not significant in the final regression models. These results indicate that for community dwelling persons without severe TBI who were evaluated and treated in outpatient clinics, they are still experiencing significant levels of chronic stress which predicts their depression levels.&aacute;Given that these persons are on average within 15 months from their date of injury, it is critical that interventions towards stress management be targeted earlier to attenuate depression levels.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:37:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:37:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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