Health Related Hardiness and Psychosocial Adaptation in Individuals with Inherited Bleeding Disorders and Other Chronic Illnesses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156284
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Related Hardiness and Psychosocial Adaptation in Individuals with Inherited Bleeding Disorders and Other Chronic Illnesses
Abstract:
Health Related Hardiness and Psychosocial Adaptation in Individuals with Inherited Bleeding Disorders and Other Chronic Illnesses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Brooks, Mirella Vasquez, PhD, FNP, APRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii at Manoa
Title:Assistant Professor
[Evidence-based Presentation] Background: An individual who is diagnosed with an inherited bleeding disorder is expected to manage his or her condition on a daily basis and researchers have studied this phenomenon in various other chronic illnesses; however, not in individuals with inherited bleeding disorders. Objectives: The aims of this study were to describe health stressors, health related hardiness, perception of illness impact, self perception of health status and psychosocial adjustment to illness in individuals living with an inherited bleeding disorder; to determine relationships between demographic and illness variables, health stressors, health related hardiness, perception of illness impact, self-perception of health status and psychosocial adjustment to illness; and to determine if perception of illness impact has a direct and/or mediating effect on the relationship between health stressors, health related hardiness, and self-perception of health status and psychosocial adjustment to illness. Method: A cross sectional survey design was used in this study. Sixty participants of predominantly Asian Pacific Islander ethnicity comprised the sample. Participants were asked to complete five questionnaires. Results: Higher health stressors were associated with higher perception of illness impact, lower perception of health status and poorer psychosocial adjustment to illness. Individuals with higher perception of illness impact were associated with lower self-perception of health status and poorer psychosocial adjustment to illness. Discussion: The knowledge generated from this study has the potential to impact the existing practices in improving evidenced-based nursing practice in caring for individuals with inherited bleeding disorders.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Related Hardiness and Psychosocial Adaptation in Individuals with Inherited Bleeding Disorders and Other Chronic Illnessesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156284-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Related Hardiness and Psychosocial Adaptation in Individuals with Inherited Bleeding Disorders and Other Chronic Illnesses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brooks, Mirella Vasquez, PhD, FNP, APRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii at Manoa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vasquez@hawaii.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Presentation] Background: An individual who is diagnosed with an inherited bleeding disorder is expected to manage his or her condition on a daily basis and researchers have studied this phenomenon in various other chronic illnesses; however, not in individuals with inherited bleeding disorders. Objectives: The aims of this study were to describe health stressors, health related hardiness, perception of illness impact, self perception of health status and psychosocial adjustment to illness in individuals living with an inherited bleeding disorder; to determine relationships between demographic and illness variables, health stressors, health related hardiness, perception of illness impact, self-perception of health status and psychosocial adjustment to illness; and to determine if perception of illness impact has a direct and/or mediating effect on the relationship between health stressors, health related hardiness, and self-perception of health status and psychosocial adjustment to illness. Method: A cross sectional survey design was used in this study. Sixty participants of predominantly Asian Pacific Islander ethnicity comprised the sample. Participants were asked to complete five questionnaires. Results: Higher health stressors were associated with higher perception of illness impact, lower perception of health status and poorer psychosocial adjustment to illness. Individuals with higher perception of illness impact were associated with lower self-perception of health status and poorer psychosocial adjustment to illness. Discussion: The knowledge generated from this study has the potential to impact the existing practices in improving evidenced-based nursing practice in caring for individuals with inherited bleeding disorders.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:37:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:37:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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