Cultural Influences on End-of-Life Decision-Making Among Ethnic Minority Elderly: A Synthesis of the Literature

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156286
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural Influences on End-of-Life Decision-Making Among Ethnic Minority Elderly: A Synthesis of the Literature
Abstract:
Cultural Influences on End-of-Life Decision-Making Among Ethnic Minority Elderly: A Synthesis of the Literature
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Butler, Frieda R., PhD, RN, MPH
P.I. Institution Name:George Mason University
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Heibatollah Baghi, PhD and Elizibeth Jacob, BS
[Research Presentation] It is presumed that one's culture plays a significant role in selecting a decision option concerning end-of-life care and is a greater influencing factor in the elderly than in the young. This research is a synthesis of research literature published between 1993 and 2006, which describes the relevance of cultural differences in four ethnic minority cultures concerning end of life decision-making. The primary purpose was to compile, review and analyze data from scientific research studies which examined culture and end-of-life decision-making. The investigators conducted an exhaustive search of published scientific articles from refereed journals and selected those articles which met the criteria for inclusion. We identified the major areas of concern, assessed analytical contributions, noted problems related to cultural differences in decision-making, and determined implications for clinical practice. Sixty-two studies were examined and 16 studies met the criteria for inclusion. Summaries for studies were generated which indicated the ethnic minority group, purpose, study design, sample size, statistical analyses and outcomes. Results of this analysis revealed significant variability among ethnic minority groups with respect to use of life sustaining technology, hospice care, and development of advance directives. African Americans were more likely to want life sustaining treatment than whites, less likely to have written advance directives and had less hospice usage. There were mixed results concerning life sustaining treatment preferred by Hispanic Americans; however, they are more likely to use life sustaining methods than whites and hospice usage was low. Asian Americans use less hospice than whites, but the data is sparse.áEuropean (non-Hispanic) Americans are more likely to forego life sustaining measures, have advance directives and have greater usage of hospice care. Additional research in this area is needed combining ethnographic approaches with carefully designed quantitative methods.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural Influences on End-of-Life Decision-Making Among Ethnic Minority Elderly: A Synthesis of the Literatureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156286-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cultural Influences on End-of-Life Decision-Making Among Ethnic Minority Elderly: A Synthesis of the Literature</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Butler, Frieda R., PhD, RN, MPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">George Mason University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">fbutler@gmu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Heibatollah Baghi, PhD and Elizibeth Jacob, BS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] It is presumed that one's culture plays a significant role in selecting a decision option concerning end-of-life care and is a greater influencing factor in the elderly than in the young. This research is a synthesis of research literature published between 1993 and 2006, which describes the relevance of cultural differences in four ethnic minority cultures concerning end of life decision-making. The primary purpose was to compile, review and analyze data from scientific research studies which examined culture and end-of-life decision-making. The investigators conducted an exhaustive search of published scientific articles from refereed journals and selected those articles which met the criteria for inclusion. We identified the major areas of concern, assessed analytical contributions, noted problems related to cultural differences in decision-making, and determined implications for clinical practice. Sixty-two studies were examined and 16 studies met the criteria for inclusion. Summaries for studies were generated which indicated the ethnic minority group, purpose, study design, sample size, statistical analyses and outcomes. Results of this analysis revealed significant variability among ethnic minority groups with respect to use of life sustaining technology, hospice care, and development of advance directives. African Americans were more likely to want life sustaining treatment than whites, less likely to have written advance directives and had less hospice usage. There were mixed results concerning life sustaining treatment preferred by Hispanic Americans; however, they are more likely to use life sustaining methods than whites and hospice usage was low. Asian Americans use less hospice than whites, but the data is sparse.&aacute;European (non-Hispanic) Americans are more likely to forego life sustaining measures, have advance directives and have greater usage of hospice care. Additional research in this area is needed combining ethnographic approaches with carefully designed quantitative methods.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:38:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:38:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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