2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156320
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Creating a Culture of Safety: Communication in Healthcare
Abstract:
Creating a Culture of Safety: Communication in Healthcare
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Forsythe, Lydia L., MSN, MA, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:St. Anthony Medical Center OSF Healthcare
Title:Director of Surgical Services and Orthopedic Service Line
[Research Presentation] Over 4000 wrong-site surgeries occur each year within the United States, and the number is rising. In an attempt to reduce that number, healthcare professionals are trying to establish a "Culture of Safety" in which operating room communication is clear, precise, and has a sense of conjoint meaning-making among team participants. This study described communication patterns among team members in an operating room in an acute care medical center. The participants included nurses, physicians, technologists, and non-clinical personnel.áDrawing on ideas of critical, micro and traditional ethnography and narrative interviewing, the data were analyzed both by thematic coding and using some of the heuristics from the theory of the Coordinated Management of Meaning (CMM). The themes revealed that to develop a culture of safety, the healthcare environment and team relationships needs to be free of intimidation and avoidance, where communication flows openly and that all of the voices on the team need to be heard in an atmosphere of equality. Most important in the creation of a culture of safety, is that patients should always be the prime focus of all team members. The findings suggest that to develop a culture of safety, professionals in healthcare need to increase their abilities to partner, trust each other as a care deliver team, treat each other with respect, and to development collaborative meaning making in an effort to deliver safe patient care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCreating a Culture of Safety: Communication in Healthcareen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156320-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Creating a Culture of Safety: Communication in Healthcare</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Forsythe, Lydia L., MSN, MA, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Anthony Medical Center OSF Healthcare</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director of Surgical Services and Orthopedic Service Line</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Lydia.forsythe@osfhealthcare.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Over 4000 wrong-site surgeries occur each year within the United States, and the number is rising. In an attempt to reduce that number, healthcare professionals are trying to establish a &quot;Culture of Safety&quot; in which operating room communication is clear, precise, and has a sense of conjoint meaning-making among team participants. This study described communication patterns among team members in an operating room in an acute care medical center. The participants included nurses, physicians, technologists, and non-clinical personnel.&aacute;Drawing on ideas of critical, micro and traditional ethnography and narrative interviewing, the data were analyzed both by thematic coding and using some of the heuristics from the theory of the Coordinated Management of Meaning (CMM). The themes revealed that to develop a culture of safety, the healthcare environment and team relationships needs to be free of intimidation and avoidance, where communication flows openly and that all of the voices on the team need to be heard in an atmosphere of equality. Most important in the creation of a culture of safety, is that patients should always be the prime focus of all team members. The findings suggest that to develop a culture of safety, professionals in healthcare need to increase their abilities to partner, trust each other as a care deliver team, treat each other with respect, and to development collaborative meaning making in an effort to deliver safe patient care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:40:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:40:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.