Preventing and managing resident aggression in long-term care settings: "Best practices"

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156325
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preventing and managing resident aggression in long-term care settings: "Best practices"
Abstract:
Preventing and managing resident aggression in long-term care settings: "Best practices"
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Guse, Lorna Wileen, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Manitoba
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Judy Inglis, MLS; Diane Cepanec, MA; Diana McMillan, RN, PhD; Marta Crawford, RN, MN; Sandy Bell, RN, MN; Kathryn Jean Hyndman, RN, BSN, MN, PhD; Luana Whitbread, RN, MN; Barbara Tallman, RN, MN; Beth Kondratuk, RN, MN and Sandra Stec, RN, MN
[Research Presentation] Older adults who are residents in long-term care settings may become aggressive as a consequence of unmet needs and communication difficulties (need-driven dementia-compromised model). The occurrence of resident aggression in long-term care has significant implications for both residents' quality of life and staff members' quality of work life. This poster reports on a project conducted by a collaborative research team consisting of managers, clinicians, researchers and educators to develop "best practice" guidelines for preventing and managing aggressive behaviour in long-term care. The team systematically reviewed relevant studies published or reported prior to 2006, critically appraising the level of evidence and findings. A set of recommendations has been developed and will be sent to external experts for review and validation prior to dissemination. The project was funded by the Nursing Care Partnership Program, Canadian Nurses' Foundation and the Collaborative Research Unit at Deer Lodge Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreventing and managing resident aggression in long-term care settings: "Best practices"en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156325-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preventing and managing resident aggression in long-term care settings: &quot;Best practices&quot;</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Guse, Lorna Wileen, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Manitoba</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lorna_guse@umanitoba.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judy Inglis, MLS; Diane Cepanec, MA; Diana McMillan, RN, PhD; Marta Crawford, RN, MN; Sandy Bell, RN, MN; Kathryn Jean Hyndman, RN, BSN, MN, PhD; Luana Whitbread, RN, MN; Barbara Tallman, RN, MN; Beth Kondratuk, RN, MN and Sandra Stec, RN, MN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Older adults who are residents in long-term care settings may become aggressive as a consequence of unmet needs and communication difficulties (need-driven dementia-compromised model). The occurrence of resident aggression in long-term care has significant implications for both residents' quality of life and staff members' quality of work life. This poster reports on a project conducted by a collaborative research team consisting of managers, clinicians, researchers and educators to develop &quot;best practice&quot; guidelines for preventing and managing aggressive behaviour in long-term care. The team systematically reviewed relevant studies published or reported prior to 2006, critically appraising the level of evidence and findings. A set of recommendations has been developed and will be sent to external experts for review and validation prior to dissemination. The project was funded by the Nursing Care Partnership Program, Canadian Nurses' Foundation and the Collaborative Research Unit at Deer Lodge Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:40:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:40:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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