2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156333
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bringing Evidence Based Educational Practices to the Nursing Classroom
Abstract:
Bringing Evidence Based Educational Practices to the Nursing Classroom
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Hough, M. Catherine, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Florida
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Kathy Robinson, PhD, RN
[Evidence-based Presentation] There is clear evidence that incorporating the principles of adult learning, self-directed learning, clinical simulation and problem based learning into clinical education assists the student to acquire life-long learning and information literacy skills.áDespite the evidence that using active learning techniques in nursing education contributes to the professional development of students, implementation of these techniques has been inconsistent globally.áNursing faculty are committed to helping students acquire a huge body of facts (and their scientific underpinnings) and the ability to synthesize and apply these facts to practice in a variety of health care settings. áFaced with these demands, faculty commonly revert to pedagogy that relies on the presentation of information via lecture, PowerPoint, and overhead transparencies.á When faced with this type of pedagogy, students take furious notes, memorize disparate facts and "cram" at the last minute for examinations.áThese strategies may allow students to pass comprehensive and/or licensure examinations, but do not promote the acquisition of either scholarly or life-long learning skills. Students who have been educated with passive learning strategies may struggle when they matriculate in graduate nursing education programs that rely on self-directed learning.áClinicians who never honed their analytic skills may have difficulty moving from traditional technical, fact-based clinical practice to higher level professional practice incorporating intuition, analysis and critical thinking.áThe revision of a Medical-Surgical nursing course in a baccalaureate curriculum in the USA is described.áThe course modification includes the retention of content presentation for a portion of each class period, followed by problem-based learning activities.áStrategies for holding students accountable for pre-requisite information and class preparation are described.áStudent and faculty response to the modified course, as well as initial evaluation data will be presented.á Plans integrating clinical simulation and critical thinking activities into the clinical component of the course will be explored.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBringing Evidence Based Educational Practices to the Nursing Classroomen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156333-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Bringing Evidence Based Educational Practices to the Nursing Classroom</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hough, M. Catherine, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mhough@unf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathy Robinson, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Presentation] There is clear evidence that incorporating the principles of adult learning, self-directed learning, clinical simulation and problem based learning into clinical education assists the student to acquire life-long learning and information literacy skills.&aacute;Despite the evidence that using active learning techniques in nursing education contributes to the professional development of students, implementation of these techniques has been inconsistent globally.&aacute;Nursing faculty are committed to helping students acquire a huge body of facts (and their scientific underpinnings) and the ability to synthesize and apply these facts to practice in a variety of health care settings. &aacute;Faced with these demands, faculty commonly revert to pedagogy that relies on the presentation of information via lecture, PowerPoint, and overhead transparencies.&aacute; When faced with this type of pedagogy, students take furious notes, memorize disparate facts and &quot;cram&quot; at the last minute for examinations.&aacute;These strategies may allow students to pass comprehensive and/or licensure examinations, but do not promote the acquisition of either scholarly or life-long learning skills. Students who have been educated with passive learning strategies may struggle when they matriculate in graduate nursing education programs that rely on self-directed learning.&aacute;Clinicians who never honed their analytic skills may have difficulty moving from traditional technical, fact-based clinical practice to higher level professional practice incorporating intuition, analysis and critical thinking.&aacute;The revision of a Medical-Surgical nursing course in a baccalaureate curriculum in the USA is described.&aacute;The course modification includes the retention of content presentation for a portion of each class period, followed by problem-based learning activities.&aacute;Strategies for holding students accountable for pre-requisite information and class preparation are described.&aacute;Student and faculty response to the modified course, as well as initial evaluation data will be presented.&aacute; Plans integrating clinical simulation and critical thinking activities into the clinical component of the course will be explored.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:40:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:40:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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