A Comparison Study of Screening Instruments for Detecting Depression During Pregnancy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156339
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparison Study of Screening Instruments for Detecting Depression During Pregnancy
Abstract:
A Comparison Study of Screening Instruments for Detecting Depression During Pregnancy
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Jensen, Linda E., RN, MN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Glen A. Palmer, PhD; Tanya Rasher-Miller, MS, ED, LMHP, NCC and Camilo Charron, PhD
[Research Presentation]erinatal depression is a serious mental disorder frequently diagnosed during pregnancy (prenatal) and the year after childbirth (postpartum) that has been shown to affect approximately 12-15% of childbearing women world-wide. Perinatal depression has the potential to have a significant effect on the health of the mother and the psychological development (social-emotional and behavioral health) of the child. Perinatal depression frequently goes undiagnosed; therefore women often do not receive necessary treatment. Several survey instruments are available to evaluate maternal mental health. However, little research has been done on the accuracy of these tools during the prenatal period, and there is no measure with acceptable predictive validity to accurately identify depression prenatally. This study examined the use of three common screening instruments for depression in a sample of women in the last trimester of pregnancy referred to an obstetrical specialty clinic. As part of the clinical interview, participants were evaluated according the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Addition, Text Revision's (DSM-IV-TR) criteria for major depression. Women in the final trimester of pregnancy who met DSM-IV-TR criteria for major depression were compared with pregnant women without major depression on three commonly used depression screening instruments: Zung Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS), Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), and Center for Epidemiological Studies Screening for Depression (CES-D). Women meeting DSM-IV_TR depression criteria scored significantly higher on all three instruments when compared to matched controls. However, recommended cutoff scores on all three instruments were found to lack proper sensitivity for women with depression in the sample of obstetrical patients. The findings suggest that current cutoff scores might be too conservative in correctly identifying women with prenatal depression, and lowering of cutoff scores might be necessary in order to correctly identify and treat women with depression during pregnancy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparison Study of Screening Instruments for Detecting Depression During Pregnancyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156339-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Comparison Study of Screening Instruments for Detecting Depression During Pregnancy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jensen, Linda E., RN, MN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ljensen@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Glen A. Palmer, PhD; Tanya Rasher-Miller, MS, ED, LMHP, NCC and Camilo Charron, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation]erinatal depression is a serious mental disorder frequently diagnosed during pregnancy (prenatal) and the year after childbirth (postpartum) that has been shown to affect approximately 12-15% of childbearing women world-wide. Perinatal depression has the potential to have a significant effect on the health of the mother and the psychological development (social-emotional and behavioral health) of the child. Perinatal depression frequently goes undiagnosed; therefore women often do not receive necessary treatment. Several survey instruments are available to evaluate maternal mental health. However, little research has been done on the accuracy of these tools during the prenatal period, and there is no measure with acceptable predictive validity to accurately identify depression prenatally. This study examined the use of three common screening instruments for depression in a sample of women in the last trimester of pregnancy referred to an obstetrical specialty clinic. As part of the clinical interview, participants were evaluated according the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Addition, Text Revision's (DSM-IV-TR) criteria for major depression. Women in the final trimester of pregnancy who met DSM-IV-TR criteria for major depression were compared with pregnant women without major depression on three commonly used depression screening instruments: Zung Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS), Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), and Center for Epidemiological Studies Screening for Depression (CES-D). Women meeting DSM-IV_TR depression criteria scored significantly higher on all three instruments when compared to matched controls. However, recommended cutoff scores on all three instruments were found to lack proper sensitivity for women with depression in the sample of obstetrical patients. The findings suggest that current cutoff scores might be too conservative in correctly identifying women with prenatal depression, and lowering of cutoff scores might be necessary in order to correctly identify and treat women with depression during pregnancy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:41:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:41:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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