2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156392
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding Obesity in Community Dwelling Old-Old
Abstract:
Understanding Obesity in Community Dwelling Old-Old
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Callen, Bonnie, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Title:Assistant Professor
Purpose: While the prevalence of obesity in the U.S. has grown dramatically across the lifespan, little is known about obesity in the old-old (those age 80 or older). Obesity in old age may exacerbate the multiple comorbidities prevalent in old age, impacting on quality of life, health outcomes, health care utilization and costs. The purpose of this study is to investigate lifetime weight changes, explore reasons for weight changes, assess motivation to change, and examine ways overweight and obese old-old feel they could successfully change their weight. Description of the Research: A cross sectional convenience sample of overweight or obese community dwelling old-old (those age 80 or older) were interviewed for this qualitative study. The setting is one southeastern county encompassing both urban and rural areas. Semi-structured interviews explored a history of weight change, causes, and motivation to change. Probing follow-up questions further explored these areas. Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated from measured height and weight for categorization. Data analysis consists of content analysis of the transcripts. Outcomes: Ongoing analysis reveals that weight gain has been relatively recent, frequently after retirement, and that this group is motivated to lose weight. Knowledge gained from this study may point to interventions targeted specifically at the needs of the old-old, the most rapidly growing portion of the U.S. population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding Obesity in Community Dwelling Old-Olden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156392-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Understanding Obesity in Community Dwelling Old-Old</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Callen, Bonnie, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Tennessee, Knoxville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bcallen@utk.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose:&nbsp;While the prevalence of obesity in the U.S. has grown dramatically across the lifespan, little is known about obesity in the old-old (those age 80 or older). Obesity in old age may exacerbate the multiple comorbidities prevalent in old age, impacting on quality of life, health outcomes, health care utilization and costs. The purpose of this study is to investigate lifetime weight changes, explore reasons for weight changes, assess motivation to change, and examine ways overweight and obese old-old feel they could successfully change their weight. Description of the Research: A cross sectional convenience sample of overweight or obese community dwelling old-old (those age 80 or older) were interviewed for this qualitative study. The setting is one southeastern county encompassing both urban and rural areas. Semi-structured interviews explored a history of weight change, causes, and motivation to change. Probing follow-up questions further explored these areas. Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated from measured height and weight for categorization. Data analysis consists of content analysis of the transcripts. Outcomes: Ongoing analysis reveals that weight gain has been relatively recent, frequently after retirement, and that this group is motivated to lose weight. Knowledge gained from this study may point to interventions targeted specifically at the needs of the old-old, the most rapidly growing portion of the U.S. population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:44:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:44:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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