2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156399
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Unmet Mental Health Needs Among Children of Different Races/Ethnicities
Abstract:
Unmet Mental Health Needs Among Children of Different Races/Ethnicities
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Chen, Huey Jen, PhD, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Florida, Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between caregivers? perceptions of their children?s mental health and unmet mental health service needs among children of different race/ethnicities.  Nearly 80% of children age 6-17 experience unmet mental health needs. It is important to identify factors contributed to youth unmet mental health needs. Caregivers play an important role in their children?s mental health care, especially for children of diverse background. Little attention has been paid to caregivers? perceptions regarding whether the children need mental health services that have not been provided.  Method: Data were obtained from caregivers of children in Florida?s Medicaid program through population based mail survey. Information on health/mental health was obtained by the Child Health Questionnaire subscale (CHQ), Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC) and reported use of services in 2001. Subjects included caregivers of 1107 children 5-18 years old with 68% boys who were reported to (1) need or use mental health services; (2) have a psychiatric disability; or (3) have a PSC score above 27. The study include children 44% White, 48%% Black, and 8% Hispanic.  Analytical Approaches: ANOVA was used to examine group differences. Logistic regression was used to identify predicting factors related to unmet mental health needs among children of diverse background. Findings:  Results indicate that recognition of needs for mental health by caregivers facilitates children?s use of mental health services regardless their race/ethnicities. Other factors related to children?s unmet mental health needs were also identified.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnmet Mental Health Needs Among Children of Different Races/Ethnicitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156399-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Unmet Mental Health Needs Among Children of Different Races/Ethnicities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chen, Huey Jen, PhD, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Florida, Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chen@fmhi.usf.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between caregivers? perceptions of their children?s mental health and unmet mental health service needs among children of different race/ethnicities. &nbsp;Nearly 80% of children age 6-17 experience unmet mental health needs. It is important to identify factors contributed to youth unmet mental health needs. Caregivers play an important role in their children?s mental health care, especially for children of diverse background. Little attention has been paid to caregivers? perceptions regarding whether the children need mental health services that have not been provided. &nbsp;Method: Data were obtained from caregivers of children in Florida?s Medicaid program through population based mail survey. Information on health/mental health was obtained by the Child Health Questionnaire subscale (CHQ), Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC) and reported use of services in 2001. Subjects included caregivers of 1107 children 5-18 years old with 68% boys who were reported to (1) need or use mental health services; (2) have a psychiatric disability; or (3) have a PSC score above 27. The study include children 44% White, 48%% Black, and 8% Hispanic. &nbsp;Analytical Approaches: ANOVA was used to examine group differences. Logistic regression was used to identify predicting factors related to unmet mental health needs among children of diverse background.&nbsp;Findings:&nbsp; Results indicate that recognition of needs for mental health by caregivers facilitates children?s use of mental health services regardless their race/ethnicities. Other factors related to children?s unmet mental health needs were also identified.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:44:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:44:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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