2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156403
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's Health Outcomes: Who Is Left Out?
Abstract:
Women's Health Outcomes: Who Is Left Out?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Chircop, Andrea, MN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Dalhousie University
Title:PhD Student
Over the past few decades the socio-political environment of health care has contributed to a profit motive that is driving the health outcomes research agenda, benefiting some to the exclusion of others.  This presentation questioned the politics of identity of nursing in its quest to produce ?nursing sensitive? health outcomes. There is a general tendency of researchers, in an attempt to contribute new knowledge of women?s health issues, to conceptualize women?s health from a mechanistic paradigm, addressing various organ systems one at a time (Grady, 2004). Methodologies that medicalise women?s health are problematic in that they reduce women?s health issues into unrelated fragments without paying attention to the context of women?s experiences, thus contributing to an inappropriate conceptualization of women?s health.  ?The power to define what counts as meaningful change in health status is typically rooted in disciplinary socialisation, linguistic traditions and an orthodox consensus that circumscribes acceptable research foci and methods? (Ray, 1999, p. 1017).   The presentation closed with suggestions of alternative approaches to women?s health research that are more in tune with women?s everyday realities. More specifically, the presentation included a brief overview of the socio-political context of the health outcomes rhetoric in Canada and internationally as it has evolved over the past 40 years or so, which mirrors the evolution of health outcomes research (Pringle & Doran, 2003).  This was followed by examples from the literature pointing to a profit motive driving the health outcomes research agenda.  After questioning the politics of nursing identity, suggestions were made that research methodologies for health outcomes that allow for a diversity of women?s voices to be heard.  Research approaches embedded within multiple intervention programs, based on conceptual designs of socioecological and social justice frameworks.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's Health Outcomes: Who Is Left Out?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156403-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women's Health Outcomes: Who Is Left Out?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chircop, Andrea, MN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Dalhousie University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">PhD Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">andrea.chircop@dal.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Over the past few decades the socio-political environment of health care has contributed to a profit motive that is driving the health outcomes research agenda, benefiting some to the exclusion of others.&nbsp; This presentation questioned the politics of identity of nursing in its quest to produce ?nursing sensitive? health outcomes. There is a general tendency of researchers, in an attempt to contribute new knowledge of women?s health issues, to conceptualize women?s health from a mechanistic paradigm, addressing various organ systems one at a time (Grady, 2004). Methodologies that medicalise women?s health are problematic in that they reduce women?s health issues into unrelated fragments without paying attention to the context of women?s experiences, thus contributing to an inappropriate conceptualization of women?s health.&nbsp; ?The power to define what counts as meaningful change in health status is typically rooted in disciplinary socialisation, linguistic traditions and an orthodox consensus that circumscribes acceptable research foci and methods? (Ray, 1999, p. 1017).&nbsp;&nbsp; The presentation closed with suggestions of alternative approaches to women?s health research that are more in tune with women?s everyday realities. More specifically, the presentation included a brief overview of the socio-political context of the health outcomes rhetoric in Canada and internationally as it has evolved over the past 40 years or so, which mirrors the evolution of health outcomes research (Pringle &amp; Doran, 2003).&nbsp; This was followed by examples from the literature pointing to a profit motive driving the health outcomes research agenda.&nbsp; After questioning the politics of nursing identity, suggestions were made that research methodologies for health outcomes that allow for a diversity of women?s voices to be heard.&nbsp; Research approaches embedded within multiple intervention programs, based on conceptual designs of socioecological and social justice frameworks.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:44:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:44:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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