2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156412
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ward Changes over Time
Abstract:
Ward Changes over Time
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Duffield, Christine, RN, PhD, BScN, MHP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Technology
Title:Professor & Director, Centre for Health Services Management
Much has been written about the need for health care systems to reduce costs and manage workforce shortages. Nurses are the largest component of the workforce and as a consequence are often the first to experience workplace reform. Data are frequently reported at the hospital-wide level indicating relative stability of the organisation and the nursing division during these periods. However, while some wards might remain relatively stable during times of great system change, this is not always the case. Mergers, downsizing and reengineering may all include changes in work assignments, modifications to clinical staffing and skill mix, and reductions in management positions and may result in increased turnover, negative work environments and less job satisfaction. In particular, hospitals are now less likely to have enough registered nurse, adequate support services, supervisors who are supportive of nursing, an influential chief nurse executive, and other organisational characteristics associated with good patient outcomes. This paper will discuss the challenges faced by first-line nurse managers, charged with responsibility for ensure adequate and safe care is provided at the ward level.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWard Changes over Timeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156412-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Ward Changes over Time</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Duffield, Christine, RN, PhD, BScN, MHP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Technology</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor &amp; Director, Centre for Health Services Management</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Christine.Duffield@uts.edu.au</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Much has been written about the need for health care systems to reduce costs and manage workforce shortages. Nurses are the largest component of the workforce and as a consequence are often the first to experience workplace reform. Data are frequently reported at the hospital-wide level indicating relative stability of the organisation and the nursing division during these periods. However, while some wards might remain relatively stable during times of great system change, this is not always the case. Mergers, downsizing and reengineering may all include changes in work assignments, modifications to clinical staffing and skill mix, and reductions in management positions and may result in increased turnover, negative work environments and less job satisfaction. In particular, hospitals are now less likely to have enough registered nurse, adequate support services, supervisors who are supportive of nursing, an influential chief nurse executive, and other organisational characteristics associated with good patient outcomes. This paper will discuss the challenges faced by first-line nurse managers, charged with responsibility for ensure adequate and safe care is provided at the ward level.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:45:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:45:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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