2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156436
Type:
Presentation
Title:
End-of-Life Communication in Intensive Care Units in Taiwan
Abstract:
End-of-Life Communication in Intensive Care Units in Taiwan
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Hsieh, Hsiu-Fang
P.I. Institution Name:Fooyin University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Feng-Ping Lee; Jing-Jy Wang, PhD, RN
Background: Death, and the decision-making that accompanies modern death, is one of the most intense experiences that humans encounter. End-of-life communication between patients, families, and clinicians not only is the best way to make certain patients receive the care they want in order to prevent unnecessary and prolong dying, but also has been regarded as one of the most important quality indicators of end-of-life care in the ICU. Objective: The study used an exploratory-descriptive design to describe the content and process of end-of-life communication in intensive care units via semi-structure interview. The analysis of interview data will utilize a qualitative content analysis. Also, the relationships between end-of-life communication and demographic characteristics are explored. Methods: One-on-one interview was conducted with families of patients who died under the care of ICU and nurses who were working in ICU in Taiwan. A directed approach to content analysis was used to analyze interview data after verbatim transcription by three content experts. Techniques are used to establish trustworthiness of the analysis. Results: The length of interview ranged from 30 minutes to more than two hours. One of the major challenges nurses faced in providing care to patients at the end of life (EOL) in the intensive care settings is to communicate with patients, their families, physicians, and other healthcare providers. Nurses played diverse but passive roles in EOL communication. They are usually mediators who identify related decision-making problems and convey the message to physicians. The center of their EOL care focuses on physical needs of dying patients and cultural needs of their families. Conclusions: This study addresses an essential focus where there is limited research available for evidence-based practice. The result of this study produces information about end-of-life communication to contribute to the state of science around end-of-life communication and decision-making in intensive care units.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnd-of-Life Communication in Intensive Care Units in Taiwanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156436-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">End-of-Life Communication in Intensive Care Units in Taiwan</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hsieh, Hsiu-Fang</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Fooyin University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hsiufang_hsieh@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Feng-Ping Lee; Jing-Jy Wang, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Death, and the decision-making that accompanies modern death, is one of the most intense experiences that humans encounter. End-of-life communication between patients, families, and clinicians not only is the best way to make certain patients receive the care they want in order to prevent unnecessary and prolong dying, but also has been regarded as one of the most important quality indicators of end-of-life care in the ICU. Objective: The study used an exploratory-descriptive design to describe the content and process of end-of-life communication in intensive care units via semi-structure interview. The analysis of interview data will utilize a qualitative content analysis. Also, the relationships between end-of-life communication and demographic characteristics are explored. Methods: One-on-one interview was conducted with families of patients who died under the care of ICU and nurses who were working in ICU in Taiwan. A directed approach to content analysis was used to analyze interview data after verbatim transcription by three content experts. Techniques are used to establish trustworthiness of the analysis. Results: The length of interview ranged from 30 minutes to more than two hours. One of the major challenges nurses faced in providing care to patients at the end of life (EOL) in the intensive care settings is to communicate with patients, their families, physicians, and other healthcare providers. Nurses played diverse but passive roles in EOL communication. They are usually mediators who identify related decision-making problems and convey the message to physicians. The center of their EOL care focuses on physical needs of dying patients and cultural needs of their families. Conclusions: This study addresses an essential focus where there is limited research available for evidence-based practice. The result of this study produces information about end-of-life communication to contribute to the state of science around end-of-life communication and decision-making in intensive care units.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:46:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:46:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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