2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156439
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcomes in Oncology Patients
Abstract:
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcomes in Oncology Patients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Hughes, Beverly S., MS, RN, AOCNS, CHPN
P.I. Institution Name:The Methodist Hospital
Title:Oncology Nurse Specialist
It has been 45 years since the introduction of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for individuals whose pulse and breathing are absent (AHA 2000). The goal in performing CPR is to ?preserve life, restore health, relieve suffering and limit disability (AHA 2000). Although CPR can be effective in appropriate situations, outcomes of CPR are varied. The survival rates for patients that undergo in hospital CPR average is 15-20% (Thel & O?Connor, 1999).Medical oncology nurses administer CPR often in patients who are unlikely to survive the CPR event and be discharged from the hospital. Several investigators found that the diagnosis of cancer, including metastatic cancer, was found to be associated with a decreased rate of survival to discharge from the hospital (Varon et al 1988 and Ebell 1992). Another study suggested that cancer patients should be considered for possible CPR ?only after considerable reflection by families and clinicians? (Taffet et al. 1988). However, there are several factors that are associated with a positive outcome of CPR in cancer patients; these include acute cardiovascular drug toxicity (Sculier and Markiewicz 1996), ventricular tachycardia /ventricular fibrillation (Martens et al 1995, Danciu et al 2004) and unwitnessed arrests (Taffett et al 1988).        The purpose of this study is to determine the outcomes of oncology patients who have a cardiac and/or respiratory arrest and undergo CPR. Specifically, the study will investigate survival rates, disposition, and functional status of oncology patients who undergo CPR. The population will be all adult oncology patients who had in-hospital CPR performed between January 1, 2002 and May 31, 2005.  Age, gender, marital status, children and their ages, ethnicity, type of cancer and stage of cancer, presence of metastatic cancer, presence of advanced directives, triage level, length of CPR, outcome of CPR, functional status will be examined.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcomes in Oncology Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156439-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Outcomes in Oncology Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hughes, Beverly S., MS, RN, AOCNS, CHPN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The Methodist Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Oncology Nurse Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bhughes@tmh.tmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">It has been 45 years since the introduction of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for individuals whose pulse and breathing are absent (AHA 2000). The goal in performing CPR is to ?preserve life, restore health, relieve suffering and limit disability (AHA 2000). Although CPR can be effective in appropriate situations, outcomes of CPR are varied. The survival rates for patients that undergo in hospital CPR average is 15-20% (Thel &amp; O?Connor, 1999).Medical oncology nurses administer CPR often in patients who are unlikely to survive the CPR event and be discharged from the hospital. Several investigators found that the diagnosis of cancer, including metastatic cancer, was found to be associated with a decreased rate of survival to discharge from the hospital (Varon et al 1988 and Ebell 1992). Another study suggested that cancer patients should be considered for possible CPR ?only after considerable reflection by families and clinicians? (Taffet et al. 1988). However, there are several factors that are associated with a positive outcome of CPR in cancer patients; these include acute cardiovascular drug toxicity (Sculier and Markiewicz 1996), ventricular tachycardia /ventricular fibrillation (Martens et al 1995, Danciu et al 2004) and unwitnessed arrests (Taffett et al 1988). &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The purpose of this study is to determine the outcomes of oncology patients who have a cardiac and/or respiratory arrest and undergo CPR. Specifically, the study will investigate survival rates, disposition, and functional status of oncology patients who undergo CPR. The population will be all adult oncology patients who had in-hospital CPR performed between January 1, 2002 and May 31, 2005.&nbsp; Age, gender, marital status, children and their ages, ethnicity, type of cancer and stage of cancer, presence of metastatic cancer, presence of advanced directives, triage level, length of CPR, outcome of CPR, functional status will be examined.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:47:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:47:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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