2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156441
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sampling Strategically: Bridging Disconnected Worlds
Abstract:
Sampling Strategically: Bridging Disconnected Worlds
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Jensen, Elsabeth, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:York University/Lawson Health Research Institute
Title:Assistant Professor/Scientist
Co-Authors:Cheryl Forchuk, RN, PhD; Rick Csiernik, MSW, PhD, RSW; Heather Atyeo,
Sampling is one of the necessary steps in the conduct of research. Entire books have been dedicated to it (Barnett, 1991; Cochran, 1977; Conway, 1967; Henry, 1990; Lwanga, 1991; Sudman, 1976), and every student of research is familiar with the topic.  Researchers take care to define their population, and then to draw samples that will be most representative of the population. Such care is required in order to secure reliable data. Unfortunately, these sampling requirements can systematically exclude invisible groups such as the homeless and people with a past history of mental illness from study, introducing a different set of biases. Finding ways to include these populations in research is a challenge. This was the experience of a team of researchers studying mental health and housing in a community-based population. We required a sample of 300 stratified by housing type: homeless, group living, supported housing, independent living. For the different subgroups different strategies were used. For example, traditional methods of randomization using lists of residents were used for group and supported homes, but for shelters, random days were chosen.  As health care research moves from clinical to community settings, the approaches to the process of sampling demand increasing creativity and flexibility in order to balance ideal with possible. This paper describes the plan, the problems and the solutions, developed by one group of researchers, in the hope that others can benefit from the lessons learned through this experience.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSampling Strategically: Bridging Disconnected Worldsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156441-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sampling Strategically: Bridging Disconnected Worlds</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jensen, Elsabeth, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">York University/Lawson Health Research Institute</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor/Scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ejensen@yorku.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cheryl Forchuk, RN, PhD; Rick Csiernik, MSW, PhD, RSW; Heather Atyeo,</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Sampling is one of the necessary steps in the conduct of research. Entire books have been dedicated to it (Barnett, 1991; Cochran, 1977; Conway, 1967; Henry, 1990; Lwanga, 1991; Sudman, 1976), and every student of research is familiar with the topic.&nbsp; Researchers take care to define their population, and then to draw samples that will be most representative of the population. Such care is required in order to secure reliable data. Unfortunately, these sampling requirements can systematically exclude invisible groups such as the homeless and people with a past history of mental illness from study, introducing a different set of biases. Finding ways to include these populations in research is a challenge. This was the experience of a team of researchers studying mental health and housing in a community-based population. We required a sample of 300 stratified by housing type: homeless, group living, supported housing, independent living. For the different subgroups different strategies were used. For example, traditional methods of randomization using lists of residents were used for group and supported homes, but for shelters, random days were chosen. &nbsp;As health care research moves from clinical to community settings, the approaches to the process of sampling demand increasing creativity and flexibility in order to balance ideal with possible. This paper describes the plan, the problems and the solutions, developed by one group of researchers, in the hope that others can benefit from the lessons learned through this experience.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:47:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:47:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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