Community as Client and Influence: Health Promotion Behaviors of Women Living in Four Neighborhoods

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156452
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community as Client and Influence: Health Promotion Behaviors of Women Living in Four Neighborhoods
Abstract:
Community as Client and Influence: Health Promotion Behaviors of Women Living in Four Neighborhoods
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Klar, Robin Toft, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Massachusetts, Worcester
Title:Assistant Professor
Purpose: Healthy People 2010 highlights the influence of the intersection of individual behaviors and environmental factors as determinants of health. This study used Pender?s revised Health Promotion Model (rHPM) to guide the inquiry of the relationship between interpersonal influences and community situational influences on women, from four distinct neighborhoods, engaging in health promotion behaviors. Social ecology was used to further expand the rHPM so that community variables could be tested. Methods: A multi-level methodological approach was used. Data gathered at the individual level examined health promotion behaviors (HPLP-II), social support behaviors (ISSB), social networks (ASSIS), and demographics. Community level data were gathered from secondary (U.S. Census and police crime statistics) and primary sources (survey of community situational influences). Descriptive statistics, correlations, and multiple regressions were conducted. Results: A stratified, according to crime statistics, random sample of 47 women who live in four separate neighborhoods within the same municipality was obtained. There was a statistically significant difference between neighborhoods of crime exposure and community-level influences: options available (p<.001), demand characteristics (p<.001), and aesthetics (p< .001). Spouses and friends were the social network members who provided socially supportive behaviors at statistically significant levels. Conclusions and Implications: Community does serve as both our client and an indicator of health. Many of the disparities noted during this study are the result of unequal policy implementation and enforcement. Community can also serve as the intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity as Client and Influence: Health Promotion Behaviors of Women Living in Four Neighborhoodsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156452-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Community as Client and Influence: Health Promotion Behaviors of Women Living in Four Neighborhoods</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Klar, Robin Toft, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Massachusetts, Worcester</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Robin.Klar@umassmed.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Healthy People 2010 highlights the influence of the intersection of individual behaviors and environmental factors as determinants of health. This study used Pender?s revised Health Promotion Model (rHPM) to guide the inquiry of the relationship between interpersonal influences and community situational influences on women, from four distinct neighborhoods, engaging in health promotion behaviors. Social ecology was used to further expand the rHPM so that community variables could be tested. Methods: A multi-level methodological approach was used. Data gathered at the individual level examined health promotion behaviors (HPLP-II), social support behaviors (ISSB), social networks (ASSIS), and demographics. Community level data were gathered from secondary (U.S. Census and police crime statistics) and primary sources (survey of community situational influences). Descriptive statistics, correlations, and multiple regressions were conducted. Results: A stratified, according to crime statistics, random sample of 47 women who live in four separate neighborhoods within the same municipality was obtained. There was a statistically significant difference between neighborhoods of crime exposure and community-level influences: options available (p&lt;.001), demand characteristics (p&lt;.001), and aesthetics (p&lt; .001). Spouses and friends were the social network members who provided socially supportive behaviors at statistically significant levels. Conclusions and Implications: Community does serve as both our client and an indicator of health. Many of the disparities noted during this study are the result of unequal policy implementation and enforcement. Community can also serve as the intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:47:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:47:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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