Two Decades of Evidence to Support Implementation of the COPE Program as Standard Practice with Parents of Young Hospitalized/Critically Ill Children & Premature Infants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156474
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Two Decades of Evidence to Support Implementation of the COPE Program as Standard Practice with Parents of Young Hospitalized/Critically Ill Children & Premature Infants
Abstract:
Two Decades of Evidence to Support Implementation of the COPE Program as Standard Practice with Parents of Young Hospitalized/Critically Ill Children & Premature Infants
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek, PhD, RN, CPNP/NPP, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:Dean, College of Nursing, and Distinguished Foundation Professor in Nursing
Co-Authors:Nancy Fischbeck Feinstein, RNC, PhD; Eileen Fairbanks, RN, MS
Hospitalization is a very stressful experience for both young children and parents, with even greater stress for families whose infants and children experience an unplanned hospitalization or intensive care unit stay. Evidence from multiple studies has supported the adverse effects following hospitalization for many premature infants and young children, including negative mental health/behavioral outcomes. Parents of hospitalized/ critically ill children and premature infants also are at high risk for mental health problems following hospitalization. The purpose of this presentation is to summarize and critically appraise the body of evidence from 6 experimental studies that tested the efficacy of the COPE (Creating Opportunities for Parent Empowerment) program on hospitalized/critically ill children, premature infants and their parents. Across the studies, parents who received COPE had less stress/anxiety and PTSD symptoms than parents who were in attention-control groups. COPE parents also had stronger beliefs in their ability to support their children and participated more in their children's care than control parents. COPE children exhibited fewer externalizing behaviors and had better developmental outcomes than control children. Implications for using the COPE program as standard practice in pediatric/neonatal intensive care units and children?s hospitals will be highlighted. Future recommendations for research also will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTwo Decades of Evidence to Support Implementation of the COPE Program as Standard Practice with Parents of Young Hospitalized/Critically Ill Children & Premature Infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156474-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Two Decades of Evidence to Support Implementation of the COPE Program as Standard Practice with Parents of Young Hospitalized/Critically Ill Children &amp; Premature Infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek, PhD, RN, CPNP/NPP, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dean, College of Nursing, and Distinguished Foundation Professor in Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Bernadette.Melnyk@asu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Nancy Fischbeck Feinstein, RNC, PhD; Eileen Fairbanks, RN, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Hospitalization is a very stressful experience for both young children and parents, with even greater stress for families whose infants and children experience an unplanned hospitalization or intensive care unit stay. Evidence from multiple studies has supported the adverse effects following hospitalization for many premature infants and young children, including negative mental health/behavioral outcomes. Parents of hospitalized/ critically ill children and premature infants also are at high risk for mental health problems following hospitalization. The purpose of this presentation is to summarize and critically appraise the body of evidence from 6 experimental studies that tested the efficacy of the COPE (Creating Opportunities for Parent Empowerment) program on hospitalized/critically ill children, premature infants and their parents. Across the studies, parents who received COPE had less stress/anxiety and PTSD symptoms than parents who were in attention-control groups. COPE parents also had stronger beliefs in their ability to support their children and participated more in their children's care than control parents. COPE children exhibited fewer externalizing behaviors and had better developmental outcomes than control children. Implications for using the COPE program as standard practice in pediatric/neonatal intensive care units and children?s hospitals will be highlighted. Future recommendations for research also will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:49:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:49:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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