Female Genital Mutilation: Health Hazards on Women, a Study in Northern Ghana

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156476
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Female Genital Mutilation: Health Hazards on Women, a Study in Northern Ghana
Abstract:
Female Genital Mutilation: Health Hazards on Women, a Study in Northern Ghana
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Mireku, Benjamin, BA, SRN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Ghana
Title:Student
Female genital mutilation (FGM), often referred to as ?female circumcision? comprises all procedures involving partial or total removal of the external female genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs whether for cultural, religious or other non therapeutic reasons. According to WHO, more than 130 million girls and women worldwide have undergone FGM and nearly 2 million more girls are at risk each year. FGM is generally performed on girls between ages 4 and 12, although it is practiced in some cultures as early as a few days after birth or as late as just prior to marriage, during pregnancy, or after the first birth. In Ghana however, the practice is highly enforced by women who in most cases have also undergone such a practice. The practitioner may or may not have health training, use anesthesia, or sterilize the circumcision instruments. Instruments used for the procedure include razor blades, glass, kitchen knives, sharp rocks, scissors, and scalpels.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFemale Genital Mutilation: Health Hazards on Women, a Study in Northern Ghanaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156476-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Female Genital Mutilation: Health Hazards on Women, a Study in Northern Ghana</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mireku, Benjamin, BA, SRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Ghana</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ibmireku@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Female genital mutilation (FGM), often referred to as ?female circumcision? comprises all procedures involving partial or total removal of the external female genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs whether for cultural, religious or other non therapeutic reasons. According to WHO, more than 130 million girls and women worldwide have undergone FGM and nearly 2 million more girls are at risk each year. FGM is generally performed on girls between ages 4 and 12, although it is practiced in some cultures as early as a few days after birth or as late as just prior to marriage, during pregnancy, or after the first birth. In Ghana however, the practice is highly enforced by women who in most cases have also undergone such a practice. The practitioner may or may not have health training, use anesthesia, or sterilize the circumcision instruments. Instruments used for the procedure include razor blades, glass, kitchen knives, sharp rocks, scissors, and scalpels.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:49:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:49:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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