The Use of Knee-Length Versus Thigh-Length Compression Stockings and Sequential Compression Devices

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156502
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Use of Knee-Length Versus Thigh-Length Compression Stockings and Sequential Compression Devices
Abstract:
The Use of Knee-Length Versus Thigh-Length Compression Stockings and Sequential Compression Devices
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 21, 2004
Author:Peterson, Janet, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:UC Davis Medical Center
Title:Administrative Nurse 2
Co-Authors:Bonnie Jean Raingruber, RN, PhD; Roumelia Decontreaus, RN, BSN; James Denman, RN, BSN; Raquel Resuello, ADN; Winifred Varnau, RN, MSN; Debra Brady, RN, MSN; Jane Brown, RN, MSN; Jaime Mahnke, N/A
Objective: To search the research literature, complete an evidence based policy revision, and evaluate outcomes to decide if knee-length or thigh-length compression stocking (T.E.D.s) and/or sequential compression devices (S.C.D.s.) are more effective and likely to be worn by patients. Setting, Design, and Method: In reviewing the current T.E.D.s and S.C.D.s policy it was noted that there was no mention of the knee-length version of these devices. Nurses on the acute care evidence based committee conducted a literature review and found evidence that there is no significant difference in the prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) whether knee-length or thigh-length T.E.D.s and/or S.C.D.s are used. The literature also reported that there are many advantages to using knee-length T.E.D.s and/or S.C.D.s over the thigh-high counterparts including ease of use, increased comfort, substantial cost savings, and better compliance. After revising the T.E.D./S.C.D.s policy to include the option to apply knee length devices when appropriate, the committee then designed a survey of 171 patients to determine the level of patient and nurse compliance with both knee length and thigh length devices in six acute care units. Concept Targeted: Is there research evidence to support the use of thigh vs knee high T.E.D.s and/or S.C.D.s for patients on general medical surgical units? Findings: With 40 of the 171 surveys completed, preliminary results indicate that patients and nurses are more compliant with knee-length T.E.D.s and S.C.D.s. Conclusions: Future patient care may be improved as a result of this evidence based policy revision if the final outcome evaluation indicates that knee-length compression stockings and devices are used more often than the thigh-high options because of ease of application, enhanced comfort, and increased compliance. Implications: Additional studies focused on institution-specific cost savings associated with use of knee-length devices are needed for varied patient populations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
21-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Use of Knee-Length Versus Thigh-Length Compression Stockings and Sequential Compression Devicesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156502-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Use of Knee-Length Versus Thigh-Length Compression Stockings and Sequential Compression Devices</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 21, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Peterson, Janet, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">UC Davis Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Administrative Nurse 2</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Janet.Peterson@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Bonnie Jean Raingruber, RN, PhD; Roumelia Decontreaus, RN, BSN; James Denman, RN, BSN; Raquel Resuello, ADN; Winifred Varnau, RN, MSN; Debra Brady, RN, MSN; Jane Brown, RN, MSN; Jaime Mahnke, N/A</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To search the research literature, complete an evidence based policy revision, and evaluate outcomes to decide if knee-length or thigh-length compression stocking (T.E.D.s) and/or sequential compression devices (S.C.D.s.) are more effective and likely to be worn by patients. Setting, Design, and Method: In reviewing the current T.E.D.s and S.C.D.s policy it was noted that there was no mention of the knee-length version of these devices. Nurses on the acute care evidence based committee conducted a literature review and found evidence that there is no significant difference in the prophylaxis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) whether knee-length or thigh-length T.E.D.s and/or S.C.D.s are used. The literature also reported that there are many advantages to using knee-length T.E.D.s and/or S.C.D.s over the thigh-high counterparts including ease of use, increased comfort, substantial cost savings, and better compliance. After revising the T.E.D./S.C.D.s policy to include the option to apply knee length devices when appropriate, the committee then designed a survey of 171 patients to determine the level of patient and nurse compliance with both knee length and thigh length devices in six acute care units. Concept Targeted: Is there research evidence to support the use of thigh vs knee high T.E.D.s and/or S.C.D.s for patients on general medical surgical units? Findings: With 40 of the 171 surveys completed, preliminary results indicate that patients and nurses are more compliant with knee-length T.E.D.s and S.C.D.s. Conclusions: Future patient care may be improved as a result of this evidence based policy revision if the final outcome evaluation indicates that knee-length compression stockings and devices are used more often than the thigh-high options because of ease of application, enhanced comfort, and increased compliance. Implications: Additional studies focused on institution-specific cost savings associated with use of knee-length devices are needed for varied patient populations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:50:46Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-21en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:50:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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