2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156536
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Overweight Children: Too Much Television?
Abstract:
Overweight Children: Too Much Television?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Shefelton, Lisa M., MSN, APN-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Arkansas State University
Title:Family Nurse Practitioner
Co-Authors:T. Lisa Waggoner, MSN, APN-BC
Over the past 20 years in the U. S, the number of overweight children has doubled and the number of adolescent children has tripled. This has been attributed to a more sedentary lifestyle than in generations past. Overweight children have a greater tendency to become overweight adults. Health problems caused by increased weight gain include: Type II diabetes, hypertension, insulin resistance, low self-esteem and elevated cholesterol. It has been estimated that the annual cost of obesity in the U. S. is $117 billion in direct and indirect costs (Carmona, 2004). This study focuses on pre-school children who lead a sedentary lifestyle and the increased incidence of becoming overweight. Also considered are the relationships among subgroups of the population and different patterns of screen time. Screen time includes video gaming, television watching, and computer usage. A quantitative, longitudinal, retrospective study was conducted. The sample studied was low-income pre-school children in rural areas of two southern states. These children were eligible for early Head Start and part of an on-going national study. Data collected included demographics, income and education level.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOverweight Children: Too Much Television?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156536-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Overweight Children: Too Much Television?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Shefelton, Lisa M., MSN, APN-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arkansas State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Family Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">davakarma@cox-internet.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">T. Lisa Waggoner, MSN, APN-BC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Over the past 20 years in the U. S, the number of overweight children has doubled and the number of adolescent children has tripled. This has been attributed to a more sedentary lifestyle than in generations past. Overweight children have a greater tendency to become overweight adults. Health problems caused by increased weight gain include: Type II diabetes, hypertension, insulin resistance, low self-esteem and elevated cholesterol. It has been estimated that the annual cost of obesity in the U. S. is $117 billion in direct and indirect costs (Carmona, 2004). This study focuses on pre-school children who lead a sedentary lifestyle and the increased incidence of becoming overweight. Also considered are the relationships among subgroups of the population and different patterns of screen time. Screen time includes video gaming, television watching, and computer usage. A quantitative, longitudinal, retrospective study was conducted. The sample studied was low-income pre-school children in rural areas of two southern states. These children were eligible for early Head Start and part of an on-going national study. Data collected included demographics, income and education level.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:52:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:52:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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