2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156538
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emotional Bankruptcy: Phenomenon in Depressed Women
Abstract:
Emotional Bankruptcy: Phenomenon in Depressed Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Gambardella, Lucille C., PhD, RN, CS, APN-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Wesley College
Title:Chair/Professor
Many women experience difficulty in their thought processes that results in an inability to develop and maintain reciprocal, rewarding long term relationships. This relationship failure leads to classic signs of depression that surface in early to mid-adulthood. These women present as depressed and with a wide range of concerns requiring therapeutic intervention. Thirty-five depressed female clients were studied using a qualitative case study methodology including initial assessment questionnaires and in-depth interviews. Data was gathered over a two year time frame and analyzed by this author. Findings indicate a phenomenon this author has named emotional bankruptcy. The subjects were unable to determine reasonable boundaries and the expectation for reciprocity in their personal or work related relationships. As a result they experienced feelings of frustration, helplessness, anger, poor self-esteem, dysfunctional relationships, and an unconscious need for control. This combination of stressful feelings leads to loss of emotional energy and inability to express personal needs. Analysis of these case studies indicates that cognitive reframing and esteem building exercises rather than medication produced the most favorable outcomes in these clients. Cognitive reframing assisted the clients to build "emotional collateral, prevent overdrafts, and to reorganize their life by creating a portfolio" for preventing further symptoms. Clinical nurse specialists in psychiatric/mental health practice can utilize these concepts in treating other depressed women who exhibit this phenomenon.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmotional Bankruptcy: Phenomenon in Depressed Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156538-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Emotional Bankruptcy: Phenomenon in Depressed Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gambardella, Lucille C., PhD, RN, CS, APN-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wesley College</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Chair/Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gambarlu@wesley.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Many women experience difficulty in their thought processes that results in an inability to develop and maintain reciprocal, rewarding long term relationships. This relationship failure leads to classic signs of depression that surface in early to mid-adulthood. These women present as depressed and with a wide range of concerns requiring therapeutic intervention. Thirty-five depressed female clients were studied using a qualitative case study methodology including initial assessment questionnaires and in-depth interviews. Data was gathered over a two year time frame and analyzed by this author. Findings indicate a phenomenon this author has named emotional bankruptcy. The subjects were unable to determine reasonable boundaries and the expectation for reciprocity in their personal or work related relationships. As a result they experienced feelings of frustration, helplessness, anger, poor self-esteem, dysfunctional relationships, and an unconscious need for control. This combination of stressful feelings leads to loss of emotional energy and inability to express personal needs. Analysis of these case studies indicates that cognitive reframing and esteem building exercises rather than medication produced the most favorable outcomes in these clients. Cognitive reframing assisted the clients to build &quot;emotional collateral, prevent overdrafts, and to reorganize their life by creating a portfolio&quot; for preventing further symptoms. Clinical nurse specialists in psychiatric/mental health practice can utilize these concepts in treating other depressed women who exhibit this phenomenon.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:52:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:52:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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