2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156544
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Person and Environmental Circumstances of Nursing Home Resident Fall Events
Abstract:
Person and Environmental Circumstances of Nursing Home Resident Fall Events
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Hill-Westmoreland, Elizabeth E., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Medicine
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
Co-Authors:Ann Marie Spellbring, PhD, RN; Ann L. Gruber-Baldini, PhD; Priscilla Tankersley Ryder, MPH; Bruce R. DeForge, PhD
Background: Nursing home (NH) residents experience approximately 1.5 falls/bed/year. Lawton's Ecological Model of Aging provided a framework for studying situation-specific person and environmental circumstances of falls. Specific Aims: To identify trends in NH resident fall events; and to describe situation-specific factors (e.g. person and environmental characteristics) and high fall risk activities. Research Design: Retrospective analyses of six months of incident report data for a group of fallers. Population: All fall events experienced by NH residents of a nine-facility Maryland NH corporation from March-August 2004. Analyses: From close-ended questions on incident reports, event-level descriptive analyses illustrate circumstances surrounding fall events. From open-ended narrative statements, an open coding procedure generated categories of situational characteristics of the person, environment and activity at the time of the fall. Results: 1,564 fall events occurred in 686 residents over six months, with an overall fall rate of 2.21 falls/bed/year for the nine-facilities. 40.5% of falls occurred during each day and evening shifts, with 19.0% on nights. In the majority of falls (65.3%) residents were found on the floor, 23.6% were witnessed, 5.2% were assisted or intercepted, 4.2% were reported falls, and 1.7% were when residents were found on other horizontal surfaces. 18.7% of falls resulted in minor injuries and 3.0% major injuries. Falls occurred in resident bedrooms (67.5%), bathrooms (8.4%), public rooms (8.7%), transit spaces (13.4%), and outdoors (2.0%). Narrative analyses revealed situation-specific person factors (lost balance, leg weakness, gait unsteadiness, incontinence, and confusion) and environmental factors (obstacles, wet/slippery floor surfaces, inadequate footwear, brakes on beds and wheelchairs). High fall risk activities included: reaching, bending, leaning, transferring, standing, walking, sitting, repositioning, and dressing. Conclusion: Findings suggest areas for fall-specific preventive interventions. Additional analyses of narrative data will lead to targeted interventions for the person and the environment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerson and Environmental Circumstances of Nursing Home Resident Fall Eventsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156544-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Person and Environmental Circumstances of Nursing Home Resident Fall Events</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hill-Westmoreland, Elizabeth E., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Medicine</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ewestmor@epi.umaryland.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ann Marie Spellbring, PhD, RN; Ann L. Gruber-Baldini, PhD; Priscilla Tankersley Ryder, MPH; Bruce R. DeForge, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Nursing home (NH) residents experience approximately 1.5 falls/bed/year. Lawton's Ecological Model of Aging provided a framework for studying situation-specific person and environmental circumstances of falls. Specific Aims: To identify trends in NH resident fall events; and to describe situation-specific factors (e.g. person and environmental characteristics) and high fall risk activities. Research Design: Retrospective analyses of six months of incident report data for a group of fallers. Population: All fall events experienced by NH residents of a nine-facility Maryland NH corporation from March-August 2004. Analyses: From close-ended questions on incident reports, event-level descriptive analyses illustrate circumstances surrounding fall events. From open-ended narrative statements, an open coding procedure generated categories of situational characteristics of the person, environment and activity at the time of the fall. Results: 1,564 fall events occurred in 686 residents over six months, with an overall fall rate of 2.21 falls/bed/year for the nine-facilities. 40.5% of falls occurred during each day and evening shifts, with 19.0% on nights. In the majority of falls (65.3%) residents were found on the floor, 23.6% were witnessed, 5.2% were assisted or intercepted, 4.2% were reported falls, and 1.7% were when residents were found on other horizontal surfaces. 18.7% of falls resulted in minor injuries and 3.0% major injuries. Falls occurred in resident bedrooms (67.5%), bathrooms (8.4%), public rooms (8.7%), transit spaces (13.4%), and outdoors (2.0%). Narrative analyses revealed situation-specific person factors (lost balance, leg weakness, gait unsteadiness, incontinence, and confusion) and environmental factors (obstacles, wet/slippery floor surfaces, inadequate footwear, brakes on beds and wheelchairs). High fall risk activities included: reaching, bending, leaning, transferring, standing, walking, sitting, repositioning, and dressing. Conclusion: Findings suggest areas for fall-specific preventive interventions. Additional analyses of narrative data will lead to targeted interventions for the person and the environment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:53:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:53:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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