2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156549
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development and Validation of the Distraction Intensity Scale
Abstract:
Development and Validation of the Distraction Intensity Scale
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Kleiber, Charmaine, RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Iowa
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Ann Marie McCarthy, RN, PhD, FAAN; Kirsten Hanrahan, RN, MSN; Latisha Myers, Student
Distraction is an intervention that parents can easily learn and provide for their children during medical procedures. However, studies on the effectiveness of distraction provided by parents show equivocal results. Until now, the ôdoseö of the distraction intervention was measured by sampling the frequency of parents' distraction coaching, without considering the quality of coaching. Quality of coaching may influence the effectiveness of distraction. This paper describes the development and validation of the Distraction Coaching Intensity Scale (DCIS), which yields a measure of distraction intensity by combining quality and frequency of distraction coaching. Methods: Nominal group technique was used to develop an extensive list of qualities evident in successful parent distraction coaching. A constant comparative process was used to refine the list. Guided by Kahnemen's ôlimited capacity for attentionö theory and Lollins & Kuczynoski's ôbidirectionality of parent-child relationshipsö theory, qualities were grouped into five mutually exclusive categories. Behavioral definitions were developed for each category. Twenty experts critiqued the definitions, establishing face validity for the DCIS. Distraction intensity is defined as the product of the DCIS quality score and the frequency of distraction coaching. Design: Discrimination validity of the DCIS was accomplished using a two-group design, comparing expert distraction coaches (Child Life Specialists) and novice distraction coaches (untrained parents). Procedures: Subjects were videotaped while providing distraction to children during intravenous catheter insertion. Two independent coders, blind to the groups and the purpose of the study, scored 20 videotapes from each group for frequency and quality of distraction coaching using the DCIS. Results: The preliminary Kappa of 0.88 demonstrated inter-rater reliability. Comparison scores for the expert and novice groups will be reported. T-test for independent groups, with alpha set a .05, will determine whether the DCIS can discriminate between expert and novice scores on frequency, quality, and intensity of distraction coaching.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment and Validation of the Distraction Intensity Scaleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156549-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development and Validation of the Distraction Intensity Scale</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kleiber, Charmaine, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Iowa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">charmaine-kleiber@uiowa.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ann Marie McCarthy, RN, PhD, FAAN; Kirsten Hanrahan, RN, MSN; Latisha Myers, Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Distraction is an intervention that parents can easily learn and provide for their children during medical procedures. However, studies on the effectiveness of distraction provided by parents show equivocal results. Until now, the &ocirc;dose&ouml; of the distraction intervention was measured by sampling the frequency of parents' distraction coaching, without considering the quality of coaching. Quality of coaching may influence the effectiveness of distraction. This paper describes the development and validation of the Distraction Coaching Intensity Scale (DCIS), which yields a measure of distraction intensity by combining quality and frequency of distraction coaching. Methods: Nominal group technique was used to develop an extensive list of qualities evident in successful parent distraction coaching. A constant comparative process was used to refine the list. Guided by Kahnemen's &ocirc;limited capacity for attention&ouml; theory and Lollins &amp; Kuczynoski's &ocirc;bidirectionality of parent-child relationships&ouml; theory, qualities were grouped into five mutually exclusive categories. Behavioral definitions were developed for each category. Twenty experts critiqued the definitions, establishing face validity for the DCIS. Distraction intensity is defined as the product of the DCIS quality score and the frequency of distraction coaching. Design: Discrimination validity of the DCIS was accomplished using a two-group design, comparing expert distraction coaches (Child Life Specialists) and novice distraction coaches (untrained parents). Procedures: Subjects were videotaped while providing distraction to children during intravenous catheter insertion. Two independent coders, blind to the groups and the purpose of the study, scored 20 videotapes from each group for frequency and quality of distraction coaching using the DCIS. Results: The preliminary Kappa of 0.88 demonstrated inter-rater reliability. Comparison scores for the expert and novice groups will be reported. T-test for independent groups, with alpha set a .05, will determine whether the DCIS can discriminate between expert and novice scores on frequency, quality, and intensity of distraction coaching.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:53:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:53:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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