A Qualitative Analysis of Parent Assessment and Management of Pain in Infants at Risk for Neurological Impairment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156550
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Qualitative Analysis of Parent Assessment and Management of Pain in Infants at Risk for Neurological Impairment
Abstract:
A Qualitative Analysis of Parent Assessment and Management of Pain in Infants at Risk for Neurological Impairment
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Stevens, Bonnie, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Sick Kids Hospital
Title:Signy Hildur Eaton Chair in Paediatric Nursing Research, Associate Chief of Nursing, Research
Co-Authors:Patrick McGrath, OC, PhD, FRSC; Joseph Beyene, PhD; Lynn Breau, PhD; Carol Camfield, MD, FRCPC; Allen Finley, MD, FRCPC; Linda Franck, RN, PhD; Sharyn Gibbins, RN, PhD; Alexandra Howlett, MD, FRCPC; C. Celeste Johnston, RN, DEd; Patricia McKeever, RN, PhD
Objectives: To determine how parents assess procedural pain in infants at varying levels of risk for neurological impairment (NI) in the NICU and at a 6-month immunization. Methods: Using a qualitative exploratory design, a purposive sample of 79 parents of 86 infants from 3 Canadian tertiary level NICUs were interviewed. Using predetermined criteria, infants were categorized as high (n= 26), moderate (n=28) and low (n=32) risk for NI. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents and analyzed using qualitative content methods. Utilizing inductive reasoning, data were organized into categories reflecting emerging themes. Results: Four categories emerged: a) appearance of pain b) parental strategies used to relieve pain c) pain relief indicators d) health professional interactions with parents and infants. Parents of high risk infants reported less body movement, facial expression and crying in the NICU compared to the low risk group. Unique to the high risk group were reports of grunting, moaning, twitching and biting behaviours. At the 6-month immunization, parents of low-risk infants reported more facial expressions compared to the high and moderate risk groups. Pain relief strategies used after a painful event included distraction techniques, vestibular movement and physical contact. Physical indicators and parent-child interaction were reported as signs that pain had been relieved. Parents reported that health professionals' management of pain generally did not include talking to parents about pain management. Conclusion: Parents used behavioural and physical indicators to assess and evaluate pain interventions in their infants. Absences of communication from health professionals and the lack of preparation for painful events highlight the importance of including parents as stakeholders in the assessment and management of their infants' pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Qualitative Analysis of Parent Assessment and Management of Pain in Infants at Risk for Neurological Impairmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156550-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Qualitative Analysis of Parent Assessment and Management of Pain in Infants at Risk for Neurological Impairment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stevens, Bonnie, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Sick Kids Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Signy Hildur Eaton Chair in Paediatric Nursing Research, Associate Chief of Nursing, Research</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">b.stevens@utoronto.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patrick McGrath, OC, PhD, FRSC; Joseph Beyene, PhD; Lynn Breau, PhD; Carol Camfield, MD, FRCPC; Allen Finley, MD, FRCPC; Linda Franck, RN, PhD; Sharyn Gibbins, RN, PhD; Alexandra Howlett, MD, FRCPC; C. Celeste Johnston, RN, DEd; Patricia McKeever, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: To determine how parents assess procedural pain in infants at varying levels of risk for neurological impairment (NI) in the NICU and at a 6-month immunization. Methods: Using a qualitative exploratory design, a purposive sample of 79 parents of 86 infants from 3 Canadian tertiary level NICUs were interviewed. Using predetermined criteria, infants were categorized as high (n= 26), moderate (n=28) and low (n=32) risk for NI. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents and analyzed using qualitative content methods. Utilizing inductive reasoning, data were organized into categories reflecting emerging themes. Results: Four categories emerged: a) appearance of pain b) parental strategies used to relieve pain c) pain relief indicators d) health professional interactions with parents and infants. Parents of high risk infants reported less body movement, facial expression and crying in the NICU compared to the low risk group. Unique to the high risk group were reports of grunting, moaning, twitching and biting behaviours. At the 6-month immunization, parents of low-risk infants reported more facial expressions compared to the high and moderate risk groups. Pain relief strategies used after a painful event included distraction techniques, vestibular movement and physical contact. Physical indicators and parent-child interaction were reported as signs that pain had been relieved. Parents reported that health professionals' management of pain generally did not include talking to parents about pain management. Conclusion: Parents used behavioural and physical indicators to assess and evaluate pain interventions in their infants. Absences of communication from health professionals and the lack of preparation for painful events highlight the importance of including parents as stakeholders in the assessment and management of their infants' pain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:53:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:53:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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