2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156551
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Lack of Preparedness for the Postpartum Period
Abstract:
Lack of Preparedness for the Postpartum Period
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:George, Lynn E., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Robert Morris University
Title:Assistant Professor
This grounded theory study examined the experiences and perspectives of primiparous women in the postpartum period following hospital discharge after childbirth. Following the dramatic changes of pregnancy and delivery the women in this study returned home feeling unprepared to care for themselves and their babies. Ten women participated in a total of 10 semi-structured interviews regarding their experiences. The participants in this study were drawn from an urban location in the northeastern United States, were primiparous, English-speaking, and 18-35 years of age. They all had experienced uncomplicated vaginal births and been discharged in 48 hours or less following childbirth. The data gathered were full of rich details and insight into their experiences. Because of their lack of preparedness at a time of increased responsibility and vulnerability, they were overwhelmed. Exhausted, feeling unwell, and isolated they struggled to adapt to new role expectation. Propelled into information-seeking by their lack of knowledge, family and friends were the primary sources for information for the majority of these new mothers, not health care professionals or services. The data gathered in this study generated a grounded theory of lack of preparedness for the postpartum period. Their lack of preparedness was characterized by four major components: change in priorities, overwhelming responsibility, unclear role expectations, and knowledge deficit. This theory of lack of preparedness for the postpartum period, synthesized from the data, provides valuable insight into the experiences of primiparous women after childbirth and provides a framework for additional research. It may also contribute to the development of programs that will address the unique needs of postpartum women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLack of Preparedness for the Postpartum Perioden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156551-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Lack of Preparedness for the Postpartum Period</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">George, Lynn E., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Robert Morris University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">george@rmu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This grounded theory study examined the experiences and perspectives of primiparous women in the postpartum period following hospital discharge after childbirth. Following the dramatic changes of pregnancy and delivery the women in this study returned home feeling unprepared to care for themselves and their babies. Ten women participated in a total of 10 semi-structured interviews regarding their experiences. The participants in this study were drawn from an urban location in the northeastern United States, were primiparous, English-speaking, and 18-35 years of age. They all had experienced uncomplicated vaginal births and been discharged in 48 hours or less following childbirth. The data gathered were full of rich details and insight into their experiences. Because of their lack of preparedness at a time of increased responsibility and vulnerability, they were overwhelmed. Exhausted, feeling unwell, and isolated they struggled to adapt to new role expectation. Propelled into information-seeking by their lack of knowledge, family and friends were the primary sources for information for the majority of these new mothers, not health care professionals or services. The data gathered in this study generated a grounded theory of lack of preparedness for the postpartum period. Their lack of preparedness was characterized by four major components: change in priorities, overwhelming responsibility, unclear role expectations, and knowledge deficit. This theory of lack of preparedness for the postpartum period, synthesized from the data, provides valuable insight into the experiences of primiparous women after childbirth and provides a framework for additional research. It may also contribute to the development of programs that will address the unique needs of postpartum women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:53:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:53:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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