Application of the Transtheoretical Model to Physical Activity Behavior of Family Caregivers in Taiwan

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156556
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Application of the Transtheoretical Model to Physical Activity Behavior of Family Caregivers in Taiwan
Abstract:
Application of the Transtheoretical Model to Physical Activity Behavior of Family Caregivers in Taiwan
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Tung, Wei-Chen, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Auburn University
Title:Dr
Co-Authors:An-Jen Lee, MD, MA; Fu-Chen Ting, BS, MA
Family caregivers are the key to maintaining the health of chronically ill patients in the Taiwanese community because cultural expectations are such that families are responsible for their ill family members. However, in comparison to either noncaregivers or normative data, family caregivers have been reported to experience poorer mental and physical health. Also, family caregivers are less likely than same-aged peers to engage in regular physical activity that are important for chronic disease prevention and control. The transtheoretical model (TTM) has been widely applied to understand the process by which individuals change their lifestyles in order to incorporate regular physical activity. The TTM acknowledges that people differ in their readiness to adopt new behaviors. That readiness can be better understood in terms of the following key constructs: (1) stages of change; (2) self-efficacy; and (3) perceived benefits/barriers. Individuals adopting a new behavior go through five stages of readiness to change (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance). The TTM suggests that individuals in later stages of the TTM exhibit higher levels of self-efficacy and perceived benefits, and lower levels of perceived barriers than those in earlier stages. The purposes of this study are to examine the relationships between stages of physical activity behavior change and other TTM constructs with Taiwanese caregivers, and to explore the factors that affect constructs from the TTM. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used. Convenience sampling was used to recruit participants. The subjects were the primary family caregivers of chronically ill patients currently receiving home care from a hospital in Taiwan. Questionnaires were used to collect data from participants. Through assessment and evaluation of the TTM and of the physical activity of family caregivers, nursing professionals who have access to family caregivers could incorporate this information into intervention strategies aimed at increasing caregivers' physical activity if appropriate.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleApplication of the Transtheoretical Model to Physical Activity Behavior of Family Caregivers in Taiwanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156556-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Application of the Transtheoretical Model to Physical Activity Behavior of Family Caregivers in Taiwan</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tung, Wei-Chen, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Auburn University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Dr</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tungwei@auburn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">An-Jen Lee, MD, MA; Fu-Chen Ting, BS, MA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Family caregivers are the key to maintaining the health of chronically ill patients in the Taiwanese community because cultural expectations are such that families are responsible for their ill family members. However, in comparison to either noncaregivers or normative data, family caregivers have been reported to experience poorer mental and physical health. Also, family caregivers are less likely than same-aged peers to engage in regular physical activity that are important for chronic disease prevention and control. The transtheoretical model (TTM) has been widely applied to understand the process by which individuals change their lifestyles in order to incorporate regular physical activity. The TTM acknowledges that people differ in their readiness to adopt new behaviors. That readiness can be better understood in terms of the following key constructs: (1) stages of change; (2) self-efficacy; and (3) perceived benefits/barriers. Individuals adopting a new behavior go through five stages of readiness to change (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance). The TTM suggests that individuals in later stages of the TTM exhibit higher levels of self-efficacy and perceived benefits, and lower levels of perceived barriers than those in earlier stages. The purposes of this study are to examine the relationships between stages of physical activity behavior change and other TTM constructs with Taiwanese caregivers, and to explore the factors that affect constructs from the TTM. A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used. Convenience sampling was used to recruit participants. The subjects were the primary family caregivers of chronically ill patients currently receiving home care from a hospital in Taiwan. Questionnaires were used to collect data from participants. Through assessment and evaluation of the TTM and of the physical activity of family caregivers, nursing professionals who have access to family caregivers could incorporate this information into intervention strategies aimed at increasing caregivers' physical activity if appropriate.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:53:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:53:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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