2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156561
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Empowering Knowledge in Ambulatory Surgical Nursing Patients' Perspective
Abstract:
Empowering Knowledge in Ambulatory Surgical Nursing Patients' Perspective
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Johansson, Kirsi, RN, MNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Turku
Title:Researcher
Co-Authors:Helena Leino-Kilpi, RN, PhD; Katja Heikkinen, RN, MNSc; Anne Kaljonen, MSocSci; Sirkku Rankinen, MNSc; Heli Virtanen, RN, MNSc; Sanna SalanterS, RN, PhD
Background and aim: Increased amount of ambulatory nursing with short hospital stays is one reason to take more consideration on patient education and its suitability for patients. The aim of this study was to examine what knowledge patients expected to receive prior to their ambulatory surgery and how these expectations were fulfilled after their educational sessions. The ultimate goal is to systematize and develop the patient education to be an empowering intervention for patient. Material and methods: The sample consisted of 145 ambulatory surgery patients at one University Hospital in Finland. The data were collected during six months in 2004 by structured questionnaires before and after patients' educational sessions. These questionnaires consisted of biophysiological, functional, experiential, ethical, social and financial dimensions of expected and received knowledge and the answering scale was from 1 (totally disagree) to 4 (totally agree). Results: About half of the patients (53 %) were female and most of patients (69 %) were aged 35 û 65 years. Most of the patients (44 %) had at least 9 years of primary education. About half of the patients (51 %) had been in ambulatory surgery previously. Patients' expected knowledge was greater (mean 3.37, sd 0.57) than the knowledge they received (mean 2.86, sd 0.73, p < 0.0001) in every dimensions (biophysiological, functional, experiential, ethical, social and financial). Patients expected most knowledge related to biophysiological issues (mean 3.61, sd 0.46) and they also received this knowledge most (mean 3.56, sd 0.48). Althought they received less than they expected the difference was not significant. In other dimensions of knowledge the differences from expected to received knowledge were statistically significant. Conclusions: The results indicate problems in several areas of patient education. Since patient education is seen as an empowering intervention, educational sessions should focus on patients' actual expectations rather than nurses' assumptions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmpowering Knowledge in Ambulatory Surgical Nursing Patients' Perspectiveen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156561-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Empowering Knowledge in Ambulatory Surgical Nursing Patients' Perspective</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johansson, Kirsi, RN, MNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Turku</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Researcher</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kimajo@utu.fi</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Helena Leino-Kilpi, RN, PhD; Katja Heikkinen, RN, MNSc; Anne Kaljonen, MSocSci; Sirkku Rankinen, MNSc; Heli Virtanen, RN, MNSc; Sanna SalanterS, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background and aim: Increased amount of ambulatory nursing with short hospital stays is one reason to take more consideration on patient education and its suitability for patients. The aim of this study was to examine what knowledge patients expected to receive prior to their ambulatory surgery and how these expectations were fulfilled after their educational sessions. The ultimate goal is to systematize and develop the patient education to be an empowering intervention for patient. Material and methods: The sample consisted of 145 ambulatory surgery patients at one University Hospital in Finland. The data were collected during six months in 2004 by structured questionnaires before and after patients' educational sessions. These questionnaires consisted of biophysiological, functional, experiential, ethical, social and financial dimensions of expected and received knowledge and the answering scale was from 1 (totally disagree) to 4 (totally agree). Results: About half of the patients (53 %) were female and most of patients (69 %) were aged 35 &ucirc; 65 years. Most of the patients (44 %) had at least 9 years of primary education. About half of the patients (51 %) had been in ambulatory surgery previously. Patients' expected knowledge was greater (mean 3.37, sd 0.57) than the knowledge they received (mean 2.86, sd 0.73, p &lt; 0.0001) in every dimensions (biophysiological, functional, experiential, ethical, social and financial). Patients expected most knowledge related to biophysiological issues (mean 3.61, sd 0.46) and they also received this knowledge most (mean 3.56, sd 0.48). Althought they received less than they expected the difference was not significant. In other dimensions of knowledge the differences from expected to received knowledge were statistically significant. Conclusions: The results indicate problems in several areas of patient education. Since patient education is seen as an empowering intervention, educational sessions should focus on patients' actual expectations rather than nurses' assumptions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:54:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:54:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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