2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156564
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A History of the Healing Traditions of Early European-American Nurses
Abstract:
A History of the Healing Traditions of Early European-American Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Libster, Martha M., PhD, RN, CNS
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University
Title:Associate Professor of Nursing
Early European-American nurses played an important role in the building of their communities and in bringing the healing traditions and nursing networks of their European ancestors to America. This paper outlines the findings of a historical study of some of the healing traditions of early and mid-nineteenth century European-American nurses' in which a triangulated case study method was used. The histories of nurses from three communities, the Shakers, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), and the Sisters of Charity provide specific examples. This paper first explores the work of Shaker infirmary nurses. Historical records demonstrate that Shaker nurses were experts in botanical medicine making and application. They were often the sole providers of healthcare in their villages. Secondly the healing traditions of the nurses and midwives of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are discussed. The focus of these nurses' care was health promotion through dietary practices, the use of herbs, and spiritual practices such as prayer and anointing with ôsweetö oil. The history of the early nursing work of the American Sisters of Charity provides evidence for the third case study. The Sisters performed nursing care in hospitals beginning in 1822 in Maryland. They were considered nursing experts by the public and physicians, particularly in the holistic care of the mentally ill.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA History of the Healing Traditions of Early European-American Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156564-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A History of the Healing Traditions of Early European-American Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Libster, Martha M., PhD, RN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mlibster@purdue.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Early European-American nurses played an important role in the building of their communities and in bringing the healing traditions and nursing networks of their European ancestors to America. This paper outlines the findings of a historical study of some of the healing traditions of early and mid-nineteenth century European-American nurses' in which a triangulated case study method was used. The histories of nurses from three communities, the Shakers, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), and the Sisters of Charity provide specific examples. This paper first explores the work of Shaker infirmary nurses. Historical records demonstrate that Shaker nurses were experts in botanical medicine making and application. They were often the sole providers of healthcare in their villages. Secondly the healing traditions of the nurses and midwives of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are discussed. The focus of these nurses' care was health promotion through dietary practices, the use of herbs, and spiritual practices such as prayer and anointing with &ocirc;sweet&ouml; oil. The history of the early nursing work of the American Sisters of Charity provides evidence for the third case study. The Sisters performed nursing care in hospitals beginning in 1822 in Maryland. They were considered nursing experts by the public and physicians, particularly in the holistic care of the mentally ill.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:54:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:54:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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