Applying Knowledge From Family Violence Narratives to Guide Healing and Health Promotion Practices

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156567
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Applying Knowledge From Family Violence Narratives to Guide Healing and Health Promotion Practices
Abstract:
Applying Knowledge From Family Violence Narratives to Guide Healing and Health Promotion Practices
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Brykczynski, Karen A., RN, FNP, FAANP, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Medical Branch
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Elizabeth Anderson, DrPH, RN, FAAN; Hiroyo Hatashita, PHN, PhD
Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to share findings from two narrative studies of family violence in order to develop practice applications. This is important because nurses are in a unique position to help families who live with abuse, but they may lack knowledge about the most effective interventions. The long term goal is to translate findings from research on family violence into effective training for primary care providers for dealing with this complex issue. Method: A cross- cultural interpretive phenomenological study of survivors of wife abuse was conducted with three women in Wakayama, Japan and three women in Galveston, Texas. An additional interpretive phenomenological study was conducted online with advanced practice nurses who shared clinical stories of family violence from their practice. Data were analyzed using a multi-stage interpretive process that proceeded from whole to parts and back to whole with ongoing attention to maintaining the situational context to guide interpretation of meanings. Findings: The cross- cultural study identified commonalities and differences between the survival processes of abused women in Japan and the USA. Survivors also described practices that helpers engaged in to facilitate their healing and provide support. The second study provides narratives from the perspective of advanced practice nurses that identify and describe healing practices and ways of being survival facilitators. Conclusion: These findings serve to enhance cross-cultural understanding of the complex process of supporting women in their healing from experiences of family violence. Healing practices and ways of being facilitators articulated here may be useful for increasing the effectiveness of nurses, counselors, and other helpers in working with this pervasive and significant health problem.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleApplying Knowledge From Family Violence Narratives to Guide Healing and Health Promotion Practicesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156567-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Applying Knowledge From Family Violence Narratives to Guide Healing and Health Promotion Practices</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brykczynski, Karen A., RN, FNP, FAANP, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Medical Branch</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kbrykczy@utmb.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elizabeth Anderson, DrPH, RN, FAAN; Hiroyo Hatashita, PHN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to share findings from two narrative studies of family violence in order to develop practice applications. This is important because nurses are in a unique position to help families who live with abuse, but they may lack knowledge about the most effective interventions. The long term goal is to translate findings from research on family violence into effective training for primary care providers for dealing with this complex issue. Method: A cross- cultural interpretive phenomenological study of survivors of wife abuse was conducted with three women in Wakayama, Japan and three women in Galveston, Texas. An additional interpretive phenomenological study was conducted online with advanced practice nurses who shared clinical stories of family violence from their practice. Data were analyzed using a multi-stage interpretive process that proceeded from whole to parts and back to whole with ongoing attention to maintaining the situational context to guide interpretation of meanings. Findings: The cross- cultural study identified commonalities and differences between the survival processes of abused women in Japan and the USA. Survivors also described practices that helpers engaged in to facilitate their healing and provide support. The second study provides narratives from the perspective of advanced practice nurses that identify and describe healing practices and ways of being survival facilitators. Conclusion: These findings serve to enhance cross-cultural understanding of the complex process of supporting women in their healing from experiences of family violence. Healing practices and ways of being facilitators articulated here may be useful for increasing the effectiveness of nurses, counselors, and other helpers in working with this pervasive and significant health problem.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:54:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:54:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.