2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156568
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Related to Feeding Readiness in Early Born Preterm Infants
Abstract:
Factors Related to Feeding Readiness in Early Born Preterm Infants
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:McGrath, Jacqueline, PhD, RN, NNP
P.I. Institution Name:Arizona State University
Title:assistant professor
BACKGROUND: Extremely Early Born (EEB) preterm infants (gestational age < 27 weeks) are the most compromised preterm infants requiring extensive stays in the NICU. Once respiratory stability is established, it is the successful attainment of oral feeding that appears to be the primary determinant of discharge readiness. All the factors that contribute to feeding readiness and thus, discharge readiness are not well defined. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between the maturation, disease status and the initiation and acquisition of full bottle feeding in EEB preterm infants during the transition to bottle feeding and prior to discharge. METHOD: This secondary analysis, utilized data collected in a non-experimental repeated measures design, from 52 EEB preterm infants recruited using a sample of convenience. Infant physiologic variables and behavioral state were observed weekly for five weeks prior to the beginning of bottle feedings. Once bottle feeding was initiated, infants were observed at three intervals with a nutritive sucking protocol. State data were collected using the Anderson Behavioral State Scale. Physiologic indicators and indicators of nutritive sucking competence were collected continuously with physiologic monitoring and the Krons Nutritive Sucking Apparatus. Data analysis for the current research included demographics, correlations and multiple regressions. RESULTS: Infant maturation as measured by gestational age and post-conceptional age is significantly correlated with initiation of feeding (p = .05). Infant disease status as measured by morbidity scoring at day 7 of life is also correlated with initiation of feeding. Progression to full feeding however, was not as well correlated with these two parameters (p = .08). This research provided increased understanding of the presentation of feeding readiness in EEB infants. Certainly, information about the relationship between maturation, disease status and feeding readiness/progression is pivotal to the practitioners' decision-making and will facilitate the appropriate initiation and successful acquisition of feeding/discharge.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Related to Feeding Readiness in Early Born Preterm Infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156568-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Related to Feeding Readiness in Early Born Preterm Infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McGrath, Jacqueline, PhD, RN, NNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Arizona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">assistant professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jacqueline@asu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">BACKGROUND: Extremely Early Born (EEB) preterm infants (gestational age &lt; 27 weeks) are the most compromised preterm infants requiring extensive stays in the NICU. Once respiratory stability is established, it is the successful attainment of oral feeding that appears to be the primary determinant of discharge readiness. All the factors that contribute to feeding readiness and thus, discharge readiness are not well defined. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between the maturation, disease status and the initiation and acquisition of full bottle feeding in EEB preterm infants during the transition to bottle feeding and prior to discharge. METHOD: This secondary analysis, utilized data collected in a non-experimental repeated measures design, from 52 EEB preterm infants recruited using a sample of convenience. Infant physiologic variables and behavioral state were observed weekly for five weeks prior to the beginning of bottle feedings. Once bottle feeding was initiated, infants were observed at three intervals with a nutritive sucking protocol. State data were collected using the Anderson Behavioral State Scale. Physiologic indicators and indicators of nutritive sucking competence were collected continuously with physiologic monitoring and the Krons Nutritive Sucking Apparatus. Data analysis for the current research included demographics, correlations and multiple regressions. RESULTS: Infant maturation as measured by gestational age and post-conceptional age is significantly correlated with initiation of feeding (p = .05). Infant disease status as measured by morbidity scoring at day 7 of life is also correlated with initiation of feeding. Progression to full feeding however, was not as well correlated with these two parameters (p = .08). This research provided increased understanding of the presentation of feeding readiness in EEB infants. Certainly, information about the relationship between maturation, disease status and feeding readiness/progression is pivotal to the practitioners' decision-making and will facilitate the appropriate initiation and successful acquisition of feeding/discharge.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:54:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:54:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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