2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156570
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Teaching Cross-Culturally: Pedagogical and Ethical Dilemmas
Abstract:
Teaching Cross-Culturally: Pedagogical and Ethical Dilemmas
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Dodgson, Joan E., PhD, MPH, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Carolyn Melby, DNSc; Marie Tarrant, RN, MN
Nurses are becoming global professionals. Western educators are in high demand in many areas of the world, as faculty and as consultants. Although cultural competency has become an emphasis within nursing, little preparation in nursing exists for professional working immersed within another culture. It is experienced differently than working with multi-cultural groups within one's own culture. The study aim was to describe the lived experience of Western educators working in cultures other than their own. A descriptive phenomenological design and approach framed this qualitative investigation. Six participants, who have doctoral education and who held faculty positions at Asian universities for a minimum of two years, were interviewed. An iterative process was used to ensure mutual understanding between the researchers and the participants. Data collection was considered complete when mutual agreement was reached. Both similarities and differences in the lived experiences occurred among the participants. However, common pedagogical and ethical dilemmas emerged from the data, providing multiple perceptions of experiences related to similar predicaments. For example, participants described the discomfort and decision-making needed to choose what to teach when the needs of the students, school and state of nursing practice differed markedly from international standards of evidence-based practice. Participants stated: ôIs it right to teach what never can be practiced?ö ôHow can we best prepare nurses who practice in a setting we haven't practiced in for forty years?ö Each dilemma will be described using the participants' own words. The findings present rich descriptions not previously found in the nursing literature. These descriptions may facilitate a professional dialog about these types of international educational exchanges and facilitate cross-cultural understandings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTeaching Cross-Culturally: Pedagogical and Ethical Dilemmasen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156570-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Teaching Cross-Culturally: Pedagogical and Ethical Dilemmas</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dodgson, Joan E., PhD, MPH, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dodgson@hawaii.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carolyn Melby, DNSc; Marie Tarrant, RN, MN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nurses are becoming global professionals. Western educators are in high demand in many areas of the world, as faculty and as consultants. Although cultural competency has become an emphasis within nursing, little preparation in nursing exists for professional working immersed within another culture. It is experienced differently than working with multi-cultural groups within one's own culture. The study aim was to describe the lived experience of Western educators working in cultures other than their own. A descriptive phenomenological design and approach framed this qualitative investigation. Six participants, who have doctoral education and who held faculty positions at Asian universities for a minimum of two years, were interviewed. An iterative process was used to ensure mutual understanding between the researchers and the participants. Data collection was considered complete when mutual agreement was reached. Both similarities and differences in the lived experiences occurred among the participants. However, common pedagogical and ethical dilemmas emerged from the data, providing multiple perceptions of experiences related to similar predicaments. For example, participants described the discomfort and decision-making needed to choose what to teach when the needs of the students, school and state of nursing practice differed markedly from international standards of evidence-based practice. Participants stated: &ocirc;Is it right to teach what never can be practiced?&ouml; &ocirc;How can we best prepare nurses who practice in a setting we haven't practiced in for forty years?&ouml; Each dilemma will be described using the participants' own words. The findings present rich descriptions not previously found in the nursing literature. These descriptions may facilitate a professional dialog about these types of international educational exchanges and facilitate cross-cultural understandings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:54:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:54:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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