2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156609
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HIV/STDs Prevention and Teens: A Behavioral Intervention
Abstract:
HIV/STDs Prevention and Teens: A Behavioral Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Butts, Janie B., DSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of Southern Mississippi
Title:Associate Professor
The purpose is to examine the effectiveness of BART, a behavioral-based curriculum. Perceptions of at-risk male and female teens in residence at the Youth Challenge Program at Camp Shelby, Mississippi, were used. BackgroundùThere were empirical and theoretical reasons to believe that high-risk adolescents could benefit from this intervention. BART (St. Lawrence et al., 1995) is based on Fisher and Fisher's (1992) three-factor conceptualization, called the IMB model (information, motivation, and behavioral skillsùa risk reduction model). Previously, pre- and post-data were collected and compared with high-risk adolescents at the Youth Challenge Program (Butts & Hartman, 2002). Significant differences were found in the mean scores of the HIV Attitude Scale (p=.081) and AIDS Risk Knowledge Test (p=.001). Feedback from the participants in the study revealed that wording on the Condom Attitude Scale and the Risk Behavior Survey was ambiguous. Comparative results of these scales were not significant and were unintelligible. All four questionnaires were edited for clarity. The design is quasi-experimental comparative. The hypotheses are that the intervention (a) will produce significant improvement in HIV attitudes, AIDS risk knowledge, and condom attitudes in teens at the YCP and (b) will significantly reduce risky behavioral intentions expressed by teens at the YCP. Two complete programs of BART were conducted with two groups, consisting of one group of males and one group of females, each with 15 to 20 participants. Pre- and post-intervention of the 4 questionnaires and a process evaluation of the program were administered. All data were combined, and comparisons were made at the .05 probability level. Analysis yielded many t-tests and ancillary tests. FindingsùSignificant differences were found on the Condom Attitude Scale, AIDS Risk Knowledge Test, HIV Attitude Scale, and parts of the Risk Behavior Survey. Recommendations for future nursing research, practice, and education are offered.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHIV/STDs Prevention and Teens: A Behavioral Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156609-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">HIV/STDs Prevention and Teens: A Behavioral Intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Butts, Janie B., DSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of Southern Mississippi</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jbondbutts@comcast.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose is to examine the effectiveness of BART, a behavioral-based curriculum. Perceptions of at-risk male and female teens in residence at the Youth Challenge Program at Camp Shelby, Mississippi, were used. Background&ugrave;There were empirical and theoretical reasons to believe that high-risk adolescents could benefit from this intervention. BART (St. Lawrence et al., 1995) is based on Fisher and Fisher's (1992) three-factor conceptualization, called the IMB model (information, motivation, and behavioral skills&ugrave;a risk reduction model). Previously, pre- and post-data were collected and compared with high-risk adolescents at the Youth Challenge Program (Butts &amp; Hartman, 2002). Significant differences were found in the mean scores of the HIV Attitude Scale (p=.081) and AIDS Risk Knowledge Test (p=.001). Feedback from the participants in the study revealed that wording on the Condom Attitude Scale and the Risk Behavior Survey was ambiguous. Comparative results of these scales were not significant and were unintelligible. All four questionnaires were edited for clarity. The design is quasi-experimental comparative. The hypotheses are that the intervention (a) will produce significant improvement in HIV attitudes, AIDS risk knowledge, and condom attitudes in teens at the YCP and (b) will significantly reduce risky behavioral intentions expressed by teens at the YCP. Two complete programs of BART were conducted with two groups, consisting of one group of males and one group of females, each with 15 to 20 participants. Pre- and post-intervention of the 4 questionnaires and a process evaluation of the program were administered. All data were combined, and comparisons were made at the .05 probability level. Analysis yielded many t-tests and ancillary tests. Findings&ugrave;Significant differences were found on the Condom Attitude Scale, AIDS Risk Knowledge Test, HIV Attitude Scale, and parts of the Risk Behavior Survey. Recommendations for future nursing research, practice, and education are offered.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:57:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:57:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.