2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156612
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Fever Management Approaches on Thermoregulatory Responses
Abstract:
Effects of Fever Management Approaches on Thermoregulatory Responses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Holtzclaw, Barbara J., RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Oklahoma Health Science Center
Title:Nurse Scientist/Research Liaison
Introduction of clinical problem: Nursing management of the febrile response has changed little throughout history aimed mainly at reducing body temperature. Unfortunately, this approach fails to acknowledge newer knowledge that febrile temperatures are a response to endogenous proinflammatory mediators. Circulating cytokines raise the hypothalamic thermoregulatory set-point range to higher levels as part of the acute phase response. Warmer body temperatures hold some documented host benefits to ill patients. Shivering, by contrast, consumes oxygen and exerts a cardiorespiratory burden. Attempts to cool the body simply stimulate shivering and promote warming responses that raise body temperatures even higher. The clinical question: ôWhat thermoregulatory responses accompany existing nursing approaches for fever management?ö Of interest are three outcomes commonly associated with fever: 1) shivering, 2) perceptions of chill, and 3) elevated body temperature. Search for evidence included review of nursing, medicine, and biologic science literature from computerized bibliographic databases of Index Medicus«, CINAHL«, and Cancerlit«. Key sources of literature on fever came from published reports of two important international conferences in thermal physiology. Summary and critical appraisal of evidence: The outcome of interest in most studies of fever management was core body temperature. Published guidelines tended to focus on managing the presumed underlying infection. Few studies measured shivering activity or acknowledged its associated distress. At least 4 studies provided scientific rationale for measures used to prevent shivering during fever or during cooling measures. Three studies showed an intervention to prevent febrile shivering, reduce perception of chills, and maintain safe temperatures. One study showed the intervention effective in keeping core temperatures lower. Evidence review shows need for translational research in fever care to move scientific knowledge from basic discovery into clinically based application. Evidence shows that interventions to prevent febrile shivering reduce distress and metabolic burden during fever but keep core temperatures at lower levels
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Fever Management Approaches on Thermoregulatory Responsesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156612-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of Fever Management Approaches on Thermoregulatory Responses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Holtzclaw, Barbara J., RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Oklahoma Health Science Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Scientist/Research Liaison</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bjholtzclaw@cox.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction of clinical problem: Nursing management of the febrile response has changed little throughout history aimed mainly at reducing body temperature. Unfortunately, this approach fails to acknowledge newer knowledge that febrile temperatures are a response to endogenous proinflammatory mediators. Circulating cytokines raise the hypothalamic thermoregulatory set-point range to higher levels as part of the acute phase response. Warmer body temperatures hold some documented host benefits to ill patients. Shivering, by contrast, consumes oxygen and exerts a cardiorespiratory burden. Attempts to cool the body simply stimulate shivering and promote warming responses that raise body temperatures even higher. The clinical question: &ocirc;What thermoregulatory responses accompany existing nursing approaches for fever management?&ouml; Of interest are three outcomes commonly associated with fever: 1) shivering, 2) perceptions of chill, and 3) elevated body temperature. Search for evidence included review of nursing, medicine, and biologic science literature from computerized bibliographic databases of Index Medicus&laquo;, CINAHL&laquo;, and Cancerlit&laquo;. Key sources of literature on fever came from published reports of two important international conferences in thermal physiology. Summary and critical appraisal of evidence: The outcome of interest in most studies of fever management was core body temperature. Published guidelines tended to focus on managing the presumed underlying infection. Few studies measured shivering activity or acknowledged its associated distress. At least 4 studies provided scientific rationale for measures used to prevent shivering during fever or during cooling measures. Three studies showed an intervention to prevent febrile shivering, reduce perception of chills, and maintain safe temperatures. One study showed the intervention effective in keeping core temperatures lower. Evidence review shows need for translational research in fever care to move scientific knowledge from basic discovery into clinically based application. Evidence shows that interventions to prevent febrile shivering reduce distress and metabolic burden during fever but keep core temperatures at lower levels</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:57:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:57:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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