2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156614
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Massage Therapy on Intraoperative and Postoperative Outcomes
Abstract:
The Effects of Massage Therapy on Intraoperative and Postoperative Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:McRee, Laura, RN, MS, LMT
P.I. Institution Name:University of Arizona
Title:Assistant ClinicalProfessor
Study Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of preoperative massage therapy on intraoperative and postoperative outcomes. Design: The study was a two group experimental design. Setting: Data were collected at University Medical Center, Northwest Medical Center, and Tucson Medical Center. Patients: 105 subjects having laparoscopic gynecologic surgery performed. The procedure included a standardized surgical entry, procedure, length of time and recovery. Intervention: Data were collected from two groups: Subjects in one group received a 30-minute massage (Massage group) and subjects in the other group received 30 minutes of passive touch (Control group). Measurements: Serum cortisol levels were drawn and anxiety was measured using a 6-item State Trait Anxiety Scale (STAI-6) preoperatively and postoperatively. Anesthesia records were reviewed to determine the administered doses of intraoperative narcotics and inhaled anesthetics. The subjects' perceived pain and nausea were measured postoperatively using a visual analog scale. The amount of pain medication received was measured. Main Results: One hundred five subjects participated in the study, 51 in the Control group and 54 in the Massage group. The subjects ranged in age from 20 to 84 years (Mean 45.5). All of the subjects were female. There was no difference between the Control and the Massage group in preoperative anxiety; patients in the Massage group had significantly less postoperative anxiety (M 9.83¦2.87 vs. C 11.24¦3.6) . Patients in the Massage group received signifcantlyless intraoperative narcotics (2.2¦1.1 versus 2.8 ¦2.0 mcg of fentanyl/Kg/hr). Conclusions: The findings suggest that preoperative massage decreased intraoperative analgesia requirements and postoperative anxiety levels in this cohort of patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Massage Therapy on Intraoperative and Postoperative Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156614-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Massage Therapy on Intraoperative and Postoperative Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McRee, Laura, RN, MS, LMT</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Arizona</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant ClinicalProfessor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lmcree@nursing.arizona.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Study Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of preoperative massage therapy on intraoperative and postoperative outcomes. Design: The study was a two group experimental design. Setting: Data were collected at University Medical Center, Northwest Medical Center, and Tucson Medical Center. Patients: 105 subjects having laparoscopic gynecologic surgery performed. The procedure included a standardized surgical entry, procedure, length of time and recovery. Intervention: Data were collected from two groups: Subjects in one group received a 30-minute massage (Massage group) and subjects in the other group received 30 minutes of passive touch (Control group). Measurements: Serum cortisol levels were drawn and anxiety was measured using a 6-item State Trait Anxiety Scale (STAI-6) preoperatively and postoperatively. Anesthesia records were reviewed to determine the administered doses of intraoperative narcotics and inhaled anesthetics. The subjects' perceived pain and nausea were measured postoperatively using a visual analog scale. The amount of pain medication received was measured. Main Results: One hundred five subjects participated in the study, 51 in the Control group and 54 in the Massage group. The subjects ranged in age from 20 to 84 years (Mean 45.5). All of the subjects were female. There was no difference between the Control and the Massage group in preoperative anxiety; patients in the Massage group had significantly less postoperative anxiety (M 9.83&brvbar;2.87 vs. C 11.24&brvbar;3.6) . Patients in the Massage group received signifcantlyless intraoperative narcotics (2.2&brvbar;1.1 versus 2.8 &brvbar;2.0 mcg of fentanyl/Kg/hr). Conclusions: The findings suggest that preoperative massage decreased intraoperative analgesia requirements and postoperative anxiety levels in this cohort of patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:57:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:57:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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