2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156622
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Global Childhood Obesity: Evidence-Based Prevention and Screening
Abstract:
Global Childhood Obesity: Evidence-Based Prevention and Screening
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2005
Author:Budd, Geraldine M., CRNP, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pennsylvania
Title:Postdoctoral Fellow
Background: The global prevalence of obesity continues to rise as more countries in the world experience shifts to urban and industrialized lifestyles. Current estimates are that 10% of the world's children aged 5-17 years old are overweight and 2-3%, or 30-45 million, are obese. Many countries in the Americas, Europe, and the Near/Middle East are affected with some populations, including ethnic and socioeconomic groups, having disproportionately high rates. The aim of this paper is to: 1) discuss the nutrition transition occurring in developing countries and 2) identify the evidence-based prevention and screening guidelines for childhood obesity. Methods: A systematic review of the literature with the keyword of global childhood obesity was performed with 1999-2004 as the years of publication and English as the language. As well, the websites of the World Health Organization, (WHO), the North American Society for the Study of Obesity, and the International Association for the Study of Obesity were reviewed for evidence on prevention and screening of childhood obesity. Results: Obesity is not restricted to industrialized societies; the rates are rising rapidly throughout the world as developing nations experience economic and social development. Almost 40% of obese children are at high risk of becoming obese adults, and when compared to non-overweight children, obese children have a significantly increased risk of having elevated fasting insulin levels, elevated triglycerides, and elevated systolic blood pressure. The prevention of obesity in children involves population, family, and individual changes that result in lower energy consumption and increased physical activity. Screening for overweight and obesity in children from birth to age 18 is recommended by global public health and medical authorities. The World Health Organization has recently issued guidelines that children should be screened using weight for height measurements, rather than weight for age and height for age.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGlobal Childhood Obesity: Evidence-Based Prevention and Screeningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156622-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Global Childhood Obesity: Evidence-Based Prevention and Screening</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Budd, Geraldine M., CRNP, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pennsylvania</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gerib@nursing.upenn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: The global prevalence of obesity continues to rise as more countries in the world experience shifts to urban and industrialized lifestyles. Current estimates are that 10% of the world's children aged 5-17 years old are overweight and 2-3%, or 30-45 million, are obese. Many countries in the Americas, Europe, and the Near/Middle East are affected with some populations, including ethnic and socioeconomic groups, having disproportionately high rates. The aim of this paper is to: 1) discuss the nutrition transition occurring in developing countries and 2) identify the evidence-based prevention and screening guidelines for childhood obesity. Methods: A systematic review of the literature with the keyword of global childhood obesity was performed with 1999-2004 as the years of publication and English as the language. As well, the websites of the World Health Organization, (WHO), the North American Society for the Study of Obesity, and the International Association for the Study of Obesity were reviewed for evidence on prevention and screening of childhood obesity. Results: Obesity is not restricted to industrialized societies; the rates are rising rapidly throughout the world as developing nations experience economic and social development. Almost 40% of obese children are at high risk of becoming obese adults, and when compared to non-overweight children, obese children have a significantly increased risk of having elevated fasting insulin levels, elevated triglycerides, and elevated systolic blood pressure. The prevention of obesity in children involves population, family, and individual changes that result in lower energy consumption and increased physical activity. Screening for overweight and obesity in children from birth to age 18 is recommended by global public health and medical authorities. The World Health Organization has recently issued guidelines that children should be screened using weight for height measurements, rather than weight for age and height for age.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:57:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:57:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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