Children's Injuries in Agriculture Related Events: The Effect of Supervision on the Injury Experience

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156628
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Children's Injuries in Agriculture Related Events: The Effect of Supervision on the Injury Experience
Abstract:
Children's Injuries in Agriculture Related Events: The Effect of Supervision on the Injury Experience
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Pryor, Susan, DNS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Southeastern Louisiana University
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Ann K. Carruth, Carrie McCoy
Objective: An international health problem and the leading cause of death and disability among rural children in the United States are unintentional injuries. Using Haddon's Injury Model as the theoretical framework, the purpose of this study is to examine injury risk in relation to supervision. <P> Design: A stratified, random sample design with parishes comprising the strata and simple random selection without replacement within each stratum was used to select addresses in 10 parishes in Louisiana. <P> Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 657 farm women participated. 177 reported having children and 32 reported having farm children who sustained at least one injury while eight children sustained two injuries within the last year. The children needing medical attention became the sample (n=37).<P> Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variable: Supervision is consistently identified as a variable effecting the risk of injury in children. Yet, no studies have focused on the relationship of children's supervision type and injury risk on the farm.<P> Methods: The Louisiana Farm Health and Injury Survey instrument was used to elicit information about characteristics of farm work, prevention practices, and demographics. Caregivers were specifically asked to identify supervision practices and childhood injuries sustained within last 12 months. <P> Findings: Descriptive and categorical data analysis methods were used to examine the associations between farm-related injury and supervision type. Children were more likely to sustain farm-related injury when they were supervised by a caregiver engaged in farm work versus supervised at home (p=.007).<P> Conclusions: The findings of this study support Haddon's Injury Model that suggests injuries occur because of an uncontrolled interaction between a host, an agent, and the environment. <P> Implications: Examining the children's role within the framework of Haddon's Injury Model, will assist researchers in designing evidenced based research that addresses the interaction between the host, agent, and environmental factors. <!--Abstract 13263 modified by 68.11.184.192 on 11-5-2002--></P></P></P></P></P></P></P>
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChildren's Injuries in Agriculture Related Events: The Effect of Supervision on the Injury Experienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156628-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Children's Injuries in Agriculture Related Events: The Effect of Supervision on the Injury Experience</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pryor, Susan, DNS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southeastern Louisiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">spryor@selu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ann K. Carruth, Carrie McCoy</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: An international health problem and the leading cause of death and disability among rural children in the United States are unintentional injuries. Using Haddon's Injury Model as the theoretical framework, the purpose of this study is to examine injury risk in relation to supervision. &lt;P&gt; Design: A stratified, random sample design with parishes comprising the strata and simple random selection without replacement within each stratum was used to select addresses in 10 parishes in Louisiana. &lt;P&gt; Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 657 farm women participated. 177 reported having children and 32 reported having farm children who sustained at least one injury while eight children sustained two injuries within the last year. The children needing medical attention became the sample (n=37).&lt;P&gt; Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variable: Supervision is consistently identified as a variable effecting the risk of injury in children. Yet, no studies have focused on the relationship of children's supervision type and injury risk on the farm.&lt;P&gt; Methods: The Louisiana Farm Health and Injury Survey instrument was used to elicit information about characteristics of farm work, prevention practices, and demographics. Caregivers were specifically asked to identify supervision practices and childhood injuries sustained within last 12 months. &lt;P&gt; Findings: Descriptive and categorical data analysis methods were used to examine the associations between farm-related injury and supervision type. Children were more likely to sustain farm-related injury when they were supervised by a caregiver engaged in farm work versus supervised at home (p=.007).&lt;P&gt; Conclusions: The findings of this study support Haddon's Injury Model that suggests injuries occur because of an uncontrolled interaction between a host, an agent, and the environment. &lt;P&gt; Implications: Examining the children's role within the framework of Haddon's Injury Model, will assist researchers in designing evidenced based research that addresses the interaction between the host, agent, and environmental factors. &lt;!--Abstract 13263 modified by 68.11.184.192 on 11-5-2002--&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:58:08Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:58:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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