Hypertension Screening and Health Behaviors Profiling in the Indigenous Vietnamese

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156639
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hypertension Screening and Health Behaviors Profiling in the Indigenous Vietnamese
Abstract:
Hypertension Screening and Health Behaviors Profiling in the Indigenous Vietnamese
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Duong, Diep, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Keesler Medical Center
Title:Research Scientist
Co-Authors:Mary Candice Ross
Objective: The objective of this study is to describe the incidence of high blood pressure (HBP) and associated health risk behaviors in an indigenous population in Viet Nam (VN). <P> Design: Descriptive.<P> Population/Sample/Setting/Years: The population of interest is an indigenous Vietnamese who live in urban and suburban areas in one of the largest city in VN. The total sample included 357 subjects; 35% male, and 65% female. The mean age was 44.9 (±17). Data were collected between Feb and Nov 2000. <P> Variables Studied: Blood pressure (BP) was measured by Welch-Allyn. Health habits and HBP knowledge were assessed using 16-item questionnaire and 12-item test, respectively. Both measures were translated and back-translated.<P> Findings: This sample had a notably high prevalence of HBP: 36.4%, as compared to 24% in Americans, and 32% in Korean Americans. However, this prevalence is relatively moderate as compared to the 44% in the Vietnamese who reside in the U.S. HBP much more common in older (69%) than younger (13%) Vietnamese. HBP also was much higher in those with lower education level (59% vs 13%). As compared to female participants, male participants were much more likely to use alcohol (55% vs 2%) and tobacco (60% vs 3%). As a group, the participants were active in regular exercise (35.9%). Despite the availability of socialized health care, 27% participants bought additional health care insurance. Albeit of free health care, only 40% seek health care on annual basis. As a whole, the group scored low (1/2 of total possible points) on HBP knowledge test.<P> Conclusions: The Vietnamese sampled in this screening reflected high risk for cardiovascular diseases. Most prevalent risks were: HBP, smoking, age, low HBP knowledge. <P> Implications: General low awareness of HBP and poor health behavior practice indicates that health screening/education initiatives are timely for this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHypertension Screening and Health Behaviors Profiling in the Indigenous Vietnameseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156639-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hypertension Screening and Health Behaviors Profiling in the Indigenous Vietnamese</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Duong, Diep, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Keesler Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">diep.duong@keesler.af.mil</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Candice Ross</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objective of this study is to describe the incidence of high blood pressure (HBP) and associated health risk behaviors in an indigenous population in Viet Nam (VN). &lt;P&gt; Design: Descriptive.&lt;P&gt; Population/Sample/Setting/Years: The population of interest is an indigenous Vietnamese who live in urban and suburban areas in one of the largest city in VN. The total sample included 357 subjects; 35% male, and 65% female. The mean age was 44.9 (&plusmn;17). Data were collected between Feb and Nov 2000. &lt;P&gt; Variables Studied: Blood pressure (BP) was measured by Welch-Allyn. Health habits and HBP knowledge were assessed using 16-item questionnaire and 12-item test, respectively. Both measures were translated and back-translated.&lt;P&gt; Findings: This sample had a notably high prevalence of HBP: 36.4%, as compared to 24% in Americans, and 32% in Korean Americans. However, this prevalence is relatively moderate as compared to the 44% in the Vietnamese who reside in the U.S. HBP much more common in older (69%) than younger (13%) Vietnamese. HBP also was much higher in those with lower education level (59% vs 13%). As compared to female participants, male participants were much more likely to use alcohol (55% vs 2%) and tobacco (60% vs 3%). As a group, the participants were active in regular exercise (35.9%). Despite the availability of socialized health care, 27% participants bought additional health care insurance. Albeit of free health care, only 40% seek health care on annual basis. As a whole, the group scored low (1/2 of total possible points) on HBP knowledge test.&lt;P&gt; Conclusions: The Vietnamese sampled in this screening reflected high risk for cardiovascular diseases. Most prevalent risks were: HBP, smoking, age, low HBP knowledge. &lt;P&gt; Implications: General low awareness of HBP and poor health behavior practice indicates that health screening/education initiatives are timely for this population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:58:48Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:58:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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