Determinants of Healthy Eating Across Stages of Change Among Midlife and Older Rural Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156640
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Determinants of Healthy Eating Across Stages of Change Among Midlife and Older Rural Women
Abstract:
Determinants of Healthy Eating Across Stages of Change Among Midlife and Older Rural Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Walker, Susan, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:Professor & Department Chair
Co-Authors:Carol H. Pullen
Objective: Poor diet is one of the top ten causes of morbidity and premature mortality among older rural women. The purpose was to determine differences in cognitive/perceptual determinants of healthy eating across the stages of change (SOC) for healthy eating (fat reduction; fruit &amp; vegetable consumption) among midlife and older rural women. Design: Descriptive cross-sectional. Population, Sample, Setting: The convenience sample of 298 rural women aged 40 to 83 were attending a national meeting of a family and community education organization in the USA. Concept or Variables Studied Together: Determinants of healthy eating (perceived self-efficacy, benefits and barriers to healthy eating) and stage of readiness for change (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance) were selected from the Transtheoretical Model. Methods: During the meeting, participants completed a packet of reliable and valid instruments, including the Healthy Eating Benefits/Barriers Scales, Healthy Eating Self-Efficacy Scale, and Stage of Eating Adherence Questionnaire. Findings: Because determinants were not highly correlated, a series of three One-Way ANOVAs followed by Scheffe's multiple comparison tests with Bonferroni adjustment were conducted both for fat SOC and fruit &amp; vegetable SOC. Main effects for self-efficacy and barriers were significant (p < .016) for both fat and fruit &amp; vegetable SOC; main effects for benefits were significant (p < .016) only for fat SOC. In general, perceived self-efficacy and perceived benefits increased while perceived barriers decreased from the precontemplation/contemplation to the maintenance stages. Multiple comparisons revealed significant (p < .016) differences in self-efficacy, benefits and barriers across fat SOC, and significant differences in self-efficacy and barriers across fruit &amp; vegetable SOC. Conclusions and Implications: Consistent with theory, women in various stages of change differed in factors that are regarded as important determinants of healthy eating behavioral change, suggesting the need to design stage-tailored dietary change interventions for this vulnerable population.<!--Abstract 13696 modified by 137.197.154.111 on 11-5-2002-->
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeterminants of Healthy Eating Across Stages of Change Among Midlife and Older Rural Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156640-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Determinants of Healthy Eating Across Stages of Change Among Midlife and Older Rural Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Walker, Susan, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor &amp; Department Chair</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">swalker@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carol H. Pullen</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Poor diet is one of the top ten causes of morbidity and premature mortality among older rural women. The purpose was to determine differences in cognitive/perceptual determinants of healthy eating across the stages of change (SOC) for healthy eating (fat reduction; fruit &amp;amp; vegetable consumption) among midlife and older rural women. Design: Descriptive cross-sectional. Population, Sample, Setting: The convenience sample of 298 rural women aged 40 to 83 were attending a national meeting of a family and community education organization in the USA. Concept or Variables Studied Together: Determinants of healthy eating (perceived self-efficacy, benefits and barriers to healthy eating) and stage of readiness for change (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance) were selected from the Transtheoretical Model. Methods: During the meeting, participants completed a packet of reliable and valid instruments, including the Healthy Eating Benefits/Barriers Scales, Healthy Eating Self-Efficacy Scale, and Stage of Eating Adherence Questionnaire. Findings: Because determinants were not highly correlated, a series of three One-Way ANOVAs followed by Scheffe's multiple comparison tests with Bonferroni adjustment were conducted both for fat SOC and fruit &amp;amp; vegetable SOC. Main effects for self-efficacy and barriers were significant (p &lt; .016) for both fat and fruit &amp;amp; vegetable SOC; main effects for benefits were significant (p &lt; .016) only for fat SOC. In general, perceived self-efficacy and perceived benefits increased while perceived barriers decreased from the precontemplation/contemplation to the maintenance stages. Multiple comparisons revealed significant (p &lt; .016) differences in self-efficacy, benefits and barriers across fat SOC, and significant differences in self-efficacy and barriers across fruit &amp;amp; vegetable SOC. Conclusions and Implications: Consistent with theory, women in various stages of change differed in factors that are regarded as important determinants of healthy eating behavioral change, suggesting the need to design stage-tailored dietary change interventions for this vulnerable population.&lt;!--Abstract 13696 modified by 137.197.154.111 on 11-5-2002--&gt;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:58:52Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:58:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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