2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156642
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Breast Self-Exam: An Experimental Study in an Underserved Population
Abstract:
Breast Self-Exam: An Experimental Study in an Underserved Population
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Periard, Mary, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan-Flint
Title:Associate Professor and Director of Department of Nursing
Objective: To test the efficacy of a single, comprehensive educational strategy on breast self exam (BSE) knowledge, frequency, technique, sensitivity and specificity in a low income, uninsured population. <P> Design: A prospective, randomized pretest-posttest experimental design was used. Data were collected prior to and at six months following intervention. <P> Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Four hundred twelve women at a Midwestern clinic for the uninsured between 1998-2000 comprised the sample. The mean age of participants was 37.9 years and 74% had an annual income of less than $12,000.<P> Intervention and Outcome Variables: The intervention variable was the educational strategy delivered to the experimental group. Outcome variables were BSE knowledge, technique, frequency, and observed proficiency, lump detection sensitivity and specificity. <P> Methods: A 92 item questionnaire, based on the Health Belief Model and Champion’s work, included knowledge, behaviors and demographic information. Teaching materials, at a sixth grade reading level, addressed a variety of learning styles. Information, demonstration, and practice on self and a silicone model were included in the strategy. Senior nursing students delivered the intervention under faculty supervision using standardized protocol. Home visits were done at six months on a sub-set of both groups to determine sensitivity, specificity and observed proficiency. <P> Findings: The experimental group had significantly higher knowledge, technique, and sensitivity scores than the control group at six months post-intervention. However, more false detections were observed in the experimental group. Further analysis is being completed on observed proficiency, sensitivity specific to lump depth and specificity. <P> Conclusions: A single educational intervention consisting of information, demonstration, and practice on self and a silicone model resulted in a significant increase in knowledge, technique and sensitivity scores. False detections remain a concern. <P> Implications: While this educational strategy may be effective, time and cost are important issues. In addition, false detections may result in increased diagnostic procedures. <!--Abstract 13843 modified by 141.216.1.4 on 11-5-2002--></P></P></P></P></P></P></P>
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBreast Self-Exam: An Experimental Study in an Underserved Populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156642-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Breast Self-Exam: An Experimental Study in an Underserved Population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Periard, Mary, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan-Flint</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Director of Department of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bknaack@umflint.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To test the efficacy of a single, comprehensive educational strategy on breast self exam (BSE) knowledge, frequency, technique, sensitivity and specificity in a low income, uninsured population. &lt;P&gt; Design: A prospective, randomized pretest-posttest experimental design was used. Data were collected prior to and at six months following intervention. &lt;P&gt; Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Four hundred twelve women at a Midwestern clinic for the uninsured between 1998-2000 comprised the sample. The mean age of participants was 37.9 years and 74% had an annual income of less than $12,000.&lt;P&gt; Intervention and Outcome Variables: The intervention variable was the educational strategy delivered to the experimental group. Outcome variables were BSE knowledge, technique, frequency, and observed proficiency, lump detection sensitivity and specificity. &lt;P&gt; Methods: A 92 item questionnaire, based on the Health Belief Model and Champion&rsquo;s work, included knowledge, behaviors and demographic information. Teaching materials, at a sixth grade reading level, addressed a variety of learning styles. Information, demonstration, and practice on self and a silicone model were included in the strategy. Senior nursing students delivered the intervention under faculty supervision using standardized protocol. Home visits were done at six months on a sub-set of both groups to determine sensitivity, specificity and observed proficiency. &lt;P&gt; Findings: The experimental group had significantly higher knowledge, technique, and sensitivity scores than the control group at six months post-intervention. However, more false detections were observed in the experimental group. Further analysis is being completed on observed proficiency, sensitivity specific to lump depth and specificity. &lt;P&gt; Conclusions: A single educational intervention consisting of information, demonstration, and practice on self and a silicone model resulted in a significant increase in knowledge, technique and sensitivity scores. False detections remain a concern. &lt;P&gt; Implications: While this educational strategy may be effective, time and cost are important issues. In addition, false detections may result in increased diagnostic procedures. &lt;!--Abstract 13843 modified by 141.216.1.4 on 11-5-2002--&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:58:59Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:58:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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