Thirst for the Milk of Human Kindness: An Ethnography of Infant Feeding Decisions among Black Women Enrolled in WIC

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156645
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Thirst for the Milk of Human Kindness: An Ethnography of Infant Feeding Decisions among Black Women Enrolled in WIC
Abstract:
Thirst for the Milk of Human Kindness: An Ethnography of Infant Feeding Decisions among Black Women Enrolled in WIC
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Cricco-Lizza, Roberta, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:
Title:
Objective: Breastfeeding rates in the U.S. do not meet national public health goals and are lowest among women who are enrolled in the WIC program. Black women are least likely to initiate breastfeeding. This investigation explored the beliefs and experiences of Black women enrolled in WIC (BWEW) to generate new insights about the resources and constraints that influence their infant feeding decisions.<P> Design: Qualitative<P> Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Research was conducted over 18-months from 1999 to 2001, on an inner city population of 319 people (130 BWEW, 116 children, 20 grandmothers, 17 fathers, 11 friends, and 25 other relatives). Eleven primiparous BWEW key informants were selected for close follow-up through pregnancy and the first postpartal year.<P> Concept or Variables: Infant Feeding Beliefs and Experiences<P> Method: An ethnographic approach was utilized. Interviewing and participant observation were conducted in the WIC clinic, homes and surrounding community to see how infant feeding decisions fit into the context of the everyday lives of BWEW. Frequent telephone calls captured the ongoing factors that influenced their feeding decisions. Field notes and transcriptions of audio taped interviews were coded on NUD*IST and analyzed for recurring patterns and themes.<P> Findings: Five major themes emerged: (1) BWEW reported little to no experience with breastfeeding. (2) Life Experiences of BWEW included a preponderance of loss and stress. (3) Infant feeding beliefs of BWEW reflected responses to life experiences. (4) Nurses and physicians provided limited education and support for infant feeding. (5) WIC was positively viewed by BWEW as a source of support.<P> Conclusions: This research provided detailed descriptions that can enhance health care professionals' understanding of infant feeding decisions. A trusting relationship with and support from health care professionals were found to powerfully influence these decisions.<P> Implications: These findings could be used to provide culturally sensitive care for BWEW. <!--Abstract 13872 modified by 152.163.188.66 on 11-5-2002--></P></P></P></P></P></P></P>
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThirst for the Milk of Human Kindness: An Ethnography of Infant Feeding Decisions among Black Women Enrolled in WICen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156645-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Thirst for the Milk of Human Kindness: An Ethnography of Infant Feeding Decisions among Black Women Enrolled in WIC</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cricco-Lizza, Roberta, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">CLroberta@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Breastfeeding rates in the U.S. do not meet national public health goals and are lowest among women who are enrolled in the WIC program. Black women are least likely to initiate breastfeeding. This investigation explored the beliefs and experiences of Black women enrolled in WIC (BWEW) to generate new insights about the resources and constraints that influence their infant feeding decisions.&lt;P&gt; Design: Qualitative&lt;P&gt; Population, Sample, Setting, Years: Research was conducted over 18-months from 1999 to 2001, on an inner city population of 319 people (130 BWEW, 116 children, 20 grandmothers, 17 fathers, 11 friends, and 25 other relatives). Eleven primiparous BWEW key informants were selected for close follow-up through pregnancy and the first postpartal year.&lt;P&gt; Concept or Variables: Infant Feeding Beliefs and Experiences&lt;P&gt; Method: An ethnographic approach was utilized. Interviewing and participant observation were conducted in the WIC clinic, homes and surrounding community to see how infant feeding decisions fit into the context of the everyday lives of BWEW. Frequent telephone calls captured the ongoing factors that influenced their feeding decisions. Field notes and transcriptions of audio taped interviews were coded on NUD*IST and analyzed for recurring patterns and themes.&lt;P&gt; Findings: Five major themes emerged: (1) BWEW reported little to no experience with breastfeeding. (2) Life Experiences of BWEW included a preponderance of loss and stress. (3) Infant feeding beliefs of BWEW reflected responses to life experiences. (4) Nurses and physicians provided limited education and support for infant feeding. (5) WIC was positively viewed by BWEW as a source of support.&lt;P&gt; Conclusions: This research provided detailed descriptions that can enhance health care professionals' understanding of infant feeding decisions. A trusting relationship with and support from health care professionals were found to powerfully influence these decisions.&lt;P&gt; Implications: These findings could be used to provide culturally sensitive care for BWEW. &lt;!--Abstract 13872 modified by 152.163.188.66 on 11-5-2002--&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:59:10Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:59:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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