Improving Health Outcomes of American Homeless Children Using a Sheltered-Based Clinic

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156646
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Health Outcomes of American Homeless Children Using a Sheltered-Based Clinic
Abstract:
Improving Health Outcomes of American Homeless Children Using a Sheltered-Based Clinic
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:DiMarco, Marguerite
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Objective: The most rapidly increasing rates of homeless are for mothers/children representing 38% of the American homeless population. The objective of this project is to show that improved access to care and health outcomes of homeless children can be achieved with a pediatric nurse practitioner (PNP) practice at a shelter. Design: A combined retrospective and prospective design is used to evaluate the PNP interventions on access to care and health outcomes of homeless children. Population, Sample, Setting, Year: The population was recruited from ACCESS, a homeless shelter in Ohio serving 334 women and 244 children in 2000. The retrospective portion of this study was a convenience sample of 447 children between 1997-2001. The prospective portion was a convenience sample of 100 children in 2002.<P> Interventions/Outcome Variables: This project described the health conditions of homeless children, documented referrals, and evaluated interventions by following-up with clients/agencies. Data were collected to determine the effectiveness of PNP interventions on evidenced-based outcomes for children/families.< Method: A quantitative descriptive method was used. Findings: The retrospective chart review indicated the most common health conditions of homeless children were as follows: missing immunizations (n=89), dental caries (n=71), respiratory conditions (n=52), vision problems (n=34), otits media (n=34), eczema (n=26), asthma (n=24), and developmental delay (n=22); 68 referrals were made. For children in the prospective study, 27% missing immunizations, 50% dental caries, 15% poor vision, 15% respiratory conditions and 86% were referred. Conclusions: Dental caries were the most prevalent condition of children and the hardest to access providers. Efforts to follow-up with these children were difficult because families changed addresses and phone numbers.< Implications: Obstacles to providing healthcare included expired medical cards or lack of insurance, no money, no transportation, and difficulty accessing providers. Using a PNP at a shelter improved access to care and promoted better outcomes for children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Health Outcomes of American Homeless Children Using a Sheltered-Based Clinicen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156646-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Improving Health Outcomes of American Homeless Children Using a Sheltered-Based Clinic</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">DiMarco, Marguerite</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dimarco@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The most rapidly increasing rates of homeless are for mothers/children representing 38% of the American homeless population. The objective of this project is to show that improved access to care and health outcomes of homeless children can be achieved with a pediatric nurse practitioner (PNP) practice at a shelter. Design: A combined retrospective and prospective design is used to evaluate the PNP interventions on access to care and health outcomes of homeless children. Population, Sample, Setting, Year: The population was recruited from ACCESS, a homeless shelter in Ohio serving 334 women and 244 children in 2000. The retrospective portion of this study was a convenience sample of 447 children between 1997-2001. The prospective portion was a convenience sample of 100 children in 2002.&lt;P&gt; Interventions/Outcome Variables: This project described the health conditions of homeless children, documented referrals, and evaluated interventions by following-up with clients/agencies. Data were collected to determine the effectiveness of PNP interventions on evidenced-based outcomes for children/families.&lt; Method: A quantitative descriptive method was used. Findings: The retrospective chart review indicated the most common health conditions of homeless children were as follows: missing immunizations (n=89), dental caries (n=71), respiratory conditions (n=52), vision problems (n=34), otits media (n=34), eczema (n=26), asthma (n=24), and developmental delay (n=22); 68 referrals were made. For children in the prospective study, 27% missing immunizations, 50% dental caries, 15% poor vision, 15% respiratory conditions and 86% were referred. Conclusions: Dental caries were the most prevalent condition of children and the hardest to access providers. Efforts to follow-up with these children were difficult because families changed addresses and phone numbers.&lt; Implications: Obstacles to providing healthcare included expired medical cards or lack of insurance, no money, no transportation, and difficulty accessing providers. Using a PNP at a shelter improved access to care and promoted better outcomes for children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:59:13Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:59:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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