2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156653
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community Participation and Marginalization in a Mixed Method Study
Abstract:
Community Participation and Marginalization in a Mixed Method Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Boutain, Doris, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Seattle University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: To explore how community members who perceived themselves as marginalized by research inquiry broadened definitions of community participation within a mixed method study. Study Design: Community input was sought during a mixed method study entitled, A Better Chance Project (ABC). ABC is a five-year, population-based prospective cohort study focused on understanding how stress impacts the premature onset of labor. About 400 multicultural women with a prior preterm birth and 400 multicultural women with a prior term birth are identified via birth certificate data and projected to enroll in the study by 2005. Methods: Three community-based board meetings were held six months apart in study year one. Fifteen to twenty key community members attended each meeting. Fifteen telephone conferences and ten informal meetings were scheduled with other local citizens. An information table was also established at three local churches to discuss the research. In year two of implementation, twenty-five community members were polled about their prior and future study involvement. Findings: Fifteen community members wanted to define levels of participation, reimbursement and input. Six other community members specifically thought the questionnaires related to perceived stress, social support and discrimination had questionable relevance. A participation and input recognition rubric was jointly created to address the concerns that research methods further marginalized the viewpoint of community members. Conclusions: There is a need to share tools for how to involve already marginalized community members in research so that further vulnerability is not produced during the inquiry process. Implications: Recognizing the need to have multiple levels of community participation, ranging from nonparticipation to total control, is effective at generating open and critical dialogue about the research process. A flexible rubric defining community participation is needed, yet not readily available to guide future researchers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity Participation and Marginalization in a Mixed Method Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156653-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Community Participation and Marginalization in a Mixed Method Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Boutain, Doris, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seattle University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dboutain@seattleu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To explore how community members who perceived themselves as marginalized by research inquiry broadened definitions of community participation within a mixed method study. Study Design: Community input was sought during a mixed method study entitled, A Better Chance Project (ABC). ABC is a five-year, population-based prospective cohort study focused on understanding how stress impacts the premature onset of labor. About 400 multicultural women with a prior preterm birth and 400 multicultural women with a prior term birth are identified via birth certificate data and projected to enroll in the study by 2005. Methods: Three community-based board meetings were held six months apart in study year one. Fifteen to twenty key community members attended each meeting. Fifteen telephone conferences and ten informal meetings were scheduled with other local citizens. An information table was also established at three local churches to discuss the research. In year two of implementation, twenty-five community members were polled about their prior and future study involvement. Findings: Fifteen community members wanted to define levels of participation, reimbursement and input. Six other community members specifically thought the questionnaires related to perceived stress, social support and discrimination had questionable relevance. A participation and input recognition rubric was jointly created to address the concerns that research methods further marginalized the viewpoint of community members. Conclusions: There is a need to share tools for how to involve already marginalized community members in research so that further vulnerability is not produced during the inquiry process. Implications: Recognizing the need to have multiple levels of community participation, ranging from nonparticipation to total control, is effective at generating open and critical dialogue about the research process. A flexible rubric defining community participation is needed, yet not readily available to guide future researchers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:59:38Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:59:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.