A Study of the Implications of Policy Implementation and the Development of Collaboration in Systems of Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156670
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Study of the Implications of Policy Implementation and the Development of Collaboration in Systems of Care
Abstract:
A Study of the Implications of Policy Implementation and the Development of Collaboration in Systems of Care
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Evans, Mary E., RN, PhD, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Florida
Title:Professor & Associate Dean
Co-Authors:Jason W. Beckstead, PhD
Objective: The purpose was to add to knowledge regarding collaboration in systems of care (SOC) for multi-need children and families as a step in testing relationships among policy approaches used to establish SOC, development of collaboration and outcomes experienced by children and families. Design: This cross-sectional, mixed methods study had 2 phases. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population was 50 states and Washington, DC. A sample of 10 states was selected through cluster analysis for site visits and key informants identified within sites. Concept studied: The major concept is collaboration among child-serving organizations. Methods: Phase 1 comprised a survey of state directors of children's mental health (N=51) requesting information on policy approaches used to establish SOC. Phase 2 comprised visits to 10 states and data collection from families through focus groups and by semi-structured interviews with case managers, administrators, and policy makers. The Interagency Collaboration Scale was administered to respondents except family members (N=261). Findings: Analysis indicated one site had significantly lower scores on attitudes toward collaboration than other sites. Qualitative data provided an explanation for this finding and were used to examine support of the study's hypotheses. Hypotheses supported related to higher levels of collaboration with capacity building or system change approaches and adequate resources. The hypothesis about superiority of a grassroots approach was not supported. Conclusions: Some ways of establishing SOC may be more effective than others in fostering collaboration. Implications: Findings supported the use of mixed methods to facilitate understanding factors promoting collaboration. This study provided initial data regarding measurement of inter-agency collaboration leading researchers to add information about leadership in future studies. Finally, practicing nurses in all positions, particularly those working with vulnerable populations, need to be concerned about identifying and fostering factors that promote inter-agency collaboration.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Study of the Implications of Policy Implementation and the Development of Collaboration in Systems of Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156670-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Study of the Implications of Policy Implementation and the Development of Collaboration in Systems of Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Evans, Mary E., RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Florida</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor &amp; Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mevans@hsc.usf.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jason W. Beckstead, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose was to add to knowledge regarding collaboration in systems of care (SOC) for multi-need children and families as a step in testing relationships among policy approaches used to establish SOC, development of collaboration and outcomes experienced by children and families. Design: This cross-sectional, mixed methods study had 2 phases. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population was 50 states and Washington, DC. A sample of 10 states was selected through cluster analysis for site visits and key informants identified within sites. Concept studied: The major concept is collaboration among child-serving organizations. Methods: Phase 1 comprised a survey of state directors of children's mental health (N=51) requesting information on policy approaches used to establish SOC. Phase 2 comprised visits to 10 states and data collection from families through focus groups and by semi-structured interviews with case managers, administrators, and policy makers. The Interagency Collaboration Scale was administered to respondents except family members (N=261). Findings: Analysis indicated one site had significantly lower scores on attitudes toward collaboration than other sites. Qualitative data provided an explanation for this finding and were used to examine support of the study's hypotheses. Hypotheses supported related to higher levels of collaboration with capacity building or system change approaches and adequate resources. The hypothesis about superiority of a grassroots approach was not supported. Conclusions: Some ways of establishing SOC may be more effective than others in fostering collaboration. Implications: Findings supported the use of mixed methods to facilitate understanding factors promoting collaboration. This study provided initial data regarding measurement of inter-agency collaboration leading researchers to add information about leadership in future studies. Finally, practicing nurses in all positions, particularly those working with vulnerable populations, need to be concerned about identifying and fostering factors that promote inter-agency collaboration.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:00:42Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:00:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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