2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156674
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescent Childbearing and Risk of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
Abstract:
Adolescent Childbearing and Risk of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Flick, Louise H., DrPH
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Cynthia Cook, PhD; Sharon M. Homan, PhD; Maryellen McSweeney, PhD; Claudia Campbell, PhD; Lisa Parnell, MSW; Mary Elizabeth Gallagher, PhD
Objective: Adolescents with problem behaviors or who experience sexual or physical violence are more likely to become pregnant as teens. In our study, the 48% who first became mothers in adolescence (<19) had twice the risk of current posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than mothers older at first birth. This study tests whether adolescent first birth contributes directly to PTSD risk or whether risks for both PTSD and adolescent first birth are explained by childhood behaviors or experiences. Design: A population-based cohort study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 745 pregnant women were recruited and interviewed at low-income, community nutrition program sites. The sample was stratified by urban/rural residence and proportional by black and white race in each county. Methods: Interviews included a structured psychiatric interview (DIS), a stressful life events scale and the Hudson partner abuse scale. Data analyses included Chi-square, bivariate logistic regression and structural equation modeling. Variables Studied Together: These included adolescent first birth (<19), current PTSD, age at worst traumatic event, life events score, Hudson partner abuse score, number of oppositional or conduct symptoms, and urban/rural residence. Findings: Adolescent parenthood was associated with early adolescent trauma (12-16 years) rather than earlier childhood or later trauma, and with oppositional or conduct symptoms occurring during or by early adolescence. Adolescent childbearers also reported more current stressful events and physical abuse indicating current exposure to greater risk. Structural equation modeling will determine whether adolescent parenthood contributes directly to increased risk of developing PTSD or whether childhood or early adolescent behaviors and events account for both increased risk of adolescent childbearing and later PTSD. Conclusions: Findings will reflect life course effects on PTSD risk. Implications: Findings will suggest the most effective point to intervene: either with childhood/early adolescent problem behaviors or through prevention of adolescent parenthood or amelioration of its consequences.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescent Childbearing and Risk of Post-traumatic Stress Disorderen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156674-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescent Childbearing and Risk of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Flick, Louise H., DrPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">flicklh@slu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cynthia Cook, PhD; Sharon M. Homan, PhD; Maryellen McSweeney, PhD; Claudia Campbell, PhD; Lisa Parnell, MSW; Mary Elizabeth Gallagher, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Adolescents with problem behaviors or who experience sexual or physical violence are more likely to become pregnant as teens. In our study, the 48% who first became mothers in adolescence (&lt;19) had twice the risk of current posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than mothers older at first birth. This study tests whether adolescent first birth contributes directly to PTSD risk or whether risks for both PTSD and adolescent first birth are explained by childhood behaviors or experiences. Design: A population-based cohort study. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 745 pregnant women were recruited and interviewed at low-income, community nutrition program sites. The sample was stratified by urban/rural residence and proportional by black and white race in each county. Methods: Interviews included a structured psychiatric interview (DIS), a stressful life events scale and the Hudson partner abuse scale. Data analyses included Chi-square, bivariate logistic regression and structural equation modeling. Variables Studied Together: These included adolescent first birth (&lt;19), current PTSD, age at worst traumatic event, life events score, Hudson partner abuse score, number of oppositional or conduct symptoms, and urban/rural residence. Findings: Adolescent parenthood was associated with early adolescent trauma (12-16 years) rather than earlier childhood or later trauma, and with oppositional or conduct symptoms occurring during or by early adolescence. Adolescent childbearers also reported more current stressful events and physical abuse indicating current exposure to greater risk. Structural equation modeling will determine whether adolescent parenthood contributes directly to increased risk of developing PTSD or whether childhood or early adolescent behaviors and events account for both increased risk of adolescent childbearing and later PTSD. Conclusions: Findings will reflect life course effects on PTSD risk. Implications: Findings will suggest the most effective point to intervene: either with childhood/early adolescent problem behaviors or through prevention of adolescent parenthood or amelioration of its consequences.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:00:57Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:00:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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