2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156679
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Critical Reflections on Studies of Nurses’ Job Satisfaction
Abstract:
Critical Reflections on Studies of Nurses’ Job Satisfaction
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Garon, Maryanne, RN, DNSc
P.I. Institution Name:California State University, Fullerton
Title:Assistant Professor of Nursing
Purposes/aims: A recently completed integrative review of the current research literature on hospital-based RN job satisfaction made it apparent that there has been unquestioned acceptance regarding traditional paradigms as well as possible paternalistic biases in this area. Brief description: I plan to describe and critically analyze research conceptualization and methods, especially tools used to measure RN job satisfaction. Tools –The majority of the research reviewed used quantitative tools, many of which were originally tested on non-nurses and work groups that were largely male. The forced-choice nature of many of these tools limits responses, raising questions about other factors experienced by registered nurses. Theory – Much of the research and existing tools on job satisfaction rely on traditional theories, such as those of Maslow and Herzberg. Underlying assumptions of these theories will be compared with nursing theories and values for potential incongruence. Nursing administrative research – It does not appear that postmodern and feminist views that have been prevalent in nursing over the past 20 years have made inroads in the more traditional area of nursing administration. Instead, the changing nature of healthcare has led to an increased business focus that can objectify nursing as a commodity. The focus on healthcare as business, in turn, can impact nurses themselves, who, can become increasingly task oriented and alienated from the caring focus of the profession. Predicted or resulting outcomes: Results of this critical review have shown that there may be a bias towards quantitative methodologies, as well as dependence on potentially inappropriate tools and theoretical frameworks. Conclusions/projected results/recommendations and future questions: The continued study of job satisfaction in nursing must include different emphases, different methodologies and different theoretical bases. It is valuable to question existing paradigms used in nursing research and to confirm that they are consistent with the profession’s.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCritical Reflections on Studies of Nurses’ Job Satisfactionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156679-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Critical Reflections on Studies of Nurses&rsquo; Job Satisfaction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Garon, Maryanne, RN, DNSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">California State University, Fullerton</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mgaron@fullerton.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purposes/aims: A recently completed integrative review of the current research literature on hospital-based RN job satisfaction made it apparent that there has been unquestioned acceptance regarding traditional paradigms as well as possible paternalistic biases in this area. Brief description: I plan to describe and critically analyze research conceptualization and methods, especially tools used to measure RN job satisfaction. Tools &ndash;The majority of the research reviewed used quantitative tools, many of which were originally tested on non-nurses and work groups that were largely male. The forced-choice nature of many of these tools limits responses, raising questions about other factors experienced by registered nurses. Theory &ndash; Much of the research and existing tools on job satisfaction rely on traditional theories, such as those of Maslow and Herzberg. Underlying assumptions of these theories will be compared with nursing theories and values for potential incongruence. Nursing administrative research &ndash; It does not appear that postmodern and feminist views that have been prevalent in nursing over the past 20 years have made inroads in the more traditional area of nursing administration. Instead, the changing nature of healthcare has led to an increased business focus that can objectify nursing as a commodity. The focus on healthcare as business, in turn, can impact nurses themselves, who, can become increasingly task oriented and alienated from the caring focus of the profession. Predicted or resulting outcomes: Results of this critical review have shown that there may be a bias towards quantitative methodologies, as well as dependence on potentially inappropriate tools and theoretical frameworks. Conclusions/projected results/recommendations and future questions: The continued study of job satisfaction in nursing must include different emphases, different methodologies and different theoretical bases. It is valuable to question existing paradigms used in nursing research and to confirm that they are consistent with the profession&rsquo;s.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:01:16Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:01:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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