2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156693
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family Perceptions of End-of-Life Care in the ICU Setting
Abstract:
Family Perceptions of End-of-Life Care in the ICU Setting
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Kjerulf, Maria, RN, MScN
P.I. Institution Name:Ryerson University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: This study reviews the satisfaction experienced by families of patients who died in the ICU of a large urban teaching hospital. This study attempts to determine whether these goals were adequately met. Design: Descriptive, quantitative Population: Families of critically ill patients in an urban teaching ICU Sample: N=53, 35% Return rate Years: Families surveyed had a loved that had died from 1994-1997, for a study period 2001. Variables: Perceptions of care, access to information, family support and attitudes toward organ donation Methods: Quantitative, survey method, likert-type scale. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics and correlational analysis. Results: Information factors associated with perceptions of care included feeling the nurses were open and honest; believing that they were informed of changes; and having the physician do the death notification. Factors associated with the perception that information was not forthcoming included: feeling visiting hours were too limited; wanting to spend more time with loved ones; not being with the loved one when they died; believing that the loved one’s pain was not properly controlled; feeling that no trained health care professionals were able to help them with their grieving; feeling the nurses were too busy; and feeling that the doctors did not spend enough time answering questions. Implications & Conclusions: These findings have important implications for ICU care. Consistency in care may be difficult in the fast pace of an ICU but are reasonable program objectives considering the positive influence this has on perceptions of care. Further, while the important contribution of being absent at the time of the patient’s death may represent anger or guilt on the part of family members that is independent of the ICU experience, this may point to the need for more flexible visitation policies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily Perceptions of End-of-Life Care in the ICU Settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156693-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family Perceptions of End-of-Life Care in the ICU Setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kjerulf, Maria, RN, MScN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ryerson University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mkjerulf@ryerson.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This study reviews the satisfaction experienced by families of patients who died in the ICU of a large urban teaching hospital. This study attempts to determine whether these goals were adequately met. Design: Descriptive, quantitative Population: Families of critically ill patients in an urban teaching ICU Sample: N=53, 35% Return rate Years: Families surveyed had a loved that had died from 1994-1997, for a study period 2001. Variables: Perceptions of care, access to information, family support and attitudes toward organ donation Methods: Quantitative, survey method, likert-type scale. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics and correlational analysis. Results: Information factors associated with perceptions of care included feeling the nurses were open and honest; believing that they were informed of changes; and having the physician do the death notification. Factors associated with the perception that information was not forthcoming included: feeling visiting hours were too limited; wanting to spend more time with loved ones; not being with the loved one when they died; believing that the loved one&rsquo;s pain was not properly controlled; feeling that no trained health care professionals were able to help them with their grieving; feeling the nurses were too busy; and feeling that the doctors did not spend enough time answering questions. Implications &amp; Conclusions: These findings have important implications for ICU care. Consistency in care may be difficult in the fast pace of an ICU but are reasonable program objectives considering the positive influence this has on perceptions of care. Further, while the important contribution of being absent at the time of the patient&rsquo;s death may represent anger or guilt on the part of family members that is independent of the ICU experience, this may point to the need for more flexible visitation policies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:02:12Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:02:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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