2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156710
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Marginalization: Implications for Health Care of Obese Women
Abstract:
Marginalization: Implications for Health Care of Obese Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Paskiewicz, Linda S., PhD, CNM, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: To describe the effect of marginalization on the health care of obese women. Organizing concept: Marginalization and the selected properties of voice, economics, differentiation, seduction, secrecy, intermediacy, and reflectiveness. Methods: A critical review of the nursing literature on the health care of obese women, the medical and socio-cultural perspectives of obesity, and the literature on marginalization of women. Findings: Obese women are marginalized in the United States by socially constructed, negative attitudes towards obesity that can compromise health care. Obese women are more likely to delay health care, particularly gynecological exams, than normal weight women. Conclusions: Application of the concept and selected properties demonstrate the negative impact on the health care of a population not previously examined as marginalized. Marginalizing health care experiences can negatively reinforce obese women's health care avoidance behavior and contribute to health risks associated with obesity. Implications: The use of nursing theoretical frameworks that embrace the properties of marginalization in research will contribute to nursing knowledge that informs practice through a deeper understanding of the context of obese women's health care experiences.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMarginalization: Implications for Health Care of Obese Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156710-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Marginalization: Implications for Health Care of Obese Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Paskiewicz, Linda S., PhD, CNM, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lpaskie@luc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To describe the effect of marginalization on the health care of obese women. Organizing concept: Marginalization and the selected properties of voice, economics, differentiation, seduction, secrecy, intermediacy, and reflectiveness. Methods: A critical review of the nursing literature on the health care of obese women, the medical and socio-cultural perspectives of obesity, and the literature on marginalization of women. Findings: Obese women are marginalized in the United States by socially constructed, negative attitudes towards obesity that can compromise health care. Obese women are more likely to delay health care, particularly gynecological exams, than normal weight women. Conclusions: Application of the concept and selected properties demonstrate the negative impact on the health care of a population not previously examined as marginalized. Marginalizing health care experiences can negatively reinforce obese women's health care avoidance behavior and contribute to health risks associated with obesity. Implications: The use of nursing theoretical frameworks that embrace the properties of marginalization in research will contribute to nursing knowledge that informs practice through a deeper understanding of the context of obese women's health care experiences.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:03:19Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:03:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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