2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156715
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Determinants of Functional Quality of Life in Community-Living Older Adults
Abstract:
Determinants of Functional Quality of Life in Community-Living Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Sachse, Donna S., PhD, RN, CS
P.I. Institution Name:Union University
Title:Chair and Associate Professor School of Nursing
Co-Authors:Judy C. Martin, PhD, APN, BC; Mona N. Wicks, PhD, RN; James M. Pruett, PhD; Susan Jacob, PhD, RN; Margaret Thorman Hartig, PhD, APN, BC; Sarah L. Mynatt, RN, EdD
ABSTRACT Objective: The study purpose was to examine contributions of psychological, social, and physical function indices and functional quality of life (FQOL) in community living older adults. Design: The descriptive-correlational study design was cross-sectional in nature. Sample and Setting: The convenience sample consisted of 100 older adults residing in mid-southern, senior rental-assisted housing. Methods: Participants responded verbally to instrument items and walked an eight-foot distance while being timed. Eight instruments were used: sociodemographic questionnaire (age, gender, race, education years); Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale; State-Trait Anxiety Inventory; Spiritual Well-Being Scale; Satisfaction with Social Support Cantril Ladder; Timed 8-Foot Walk (walking speed as physical performance surrogate); Medical Outcomes Studies Short-Form –12v2 to assess FQOL. Multiple regression analyses were computed to determine relationships among study variables. Findings: Generally, participants were cognitively intact, experiencing high levels of spiritual well-being, satisfied with their social support, and mobile. However, psychosocial and physical FQOL scores were low. Regression analyses revealed unexpected variable influences on FQOL. Anxiety was most influencing on psychosocial FQOL. Spiritual well-being was influencing for male and female physical FQOL. Although 60 percent of the variance for physical FQOL of males was explained, only 17 percent of physical FQOL was explained for females. With the exception of education, there were no racial differences in predictors of FQOL. Conclusions: Quality of life is foremost a subjective phenomenon. The older adult’s personal perspective is significant for measures of FQOL. Psychosocial indices strongly influence FQOL, particularly anxiety, depression, and spiritual well-being. Implications: This study lends strong support for screening for anxiety in addition to depression in the older adult and for promoting spiritual well-being to enhance FQOL. Instruments that solicit the client’s opinion concerning daily functioning would provide a thorough and truthful picture of FQOL and better inform and direct interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeterminants of Functional Quality of Life in Community-Living Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156715-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Determinants of Functional Quality of Life in Community-Living Older Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sachse, Donna S., PhD, RN, CS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Union University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Chair and Associate Professor School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dsachse@uu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Judy C. Martin, PhD, APN, BC; Mona N. Wicks, PhD, RN; James M. Pruett, PhD; Susan Jacob, PhD, RN; Margaret Thorman Hartig, PhD, APN, BC; Sarah L. Mynatt, RN, EdD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">ABSTRACT Objective: The study purpose was to examine contributions of psychological, social, and physical function indices and functional quality of life (FQOL) in community living older adults. Design: The descriptive-correlational study design was cross-sectional in nature. Sample and Setting: The convenience sample consisted of 100 older adults residing in mid-southern, senior rental-assisted housing. Methods: Participants responded verbally to instrument items and walked an eight-foot distance while being timed. Eight instruments were used: sociodemographic questionnaire (age, gender, race, education years); Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale; State-Trait Anxiety Inventory; Spiritual Well-Being Scale; Satisfaction with Social Support Cantril Ladder; Timed 8-Foot Walk (walking speed as physical performance surrogate); Medical Outcomes Studies Short-Form &ndash;12v2 to assess FQOL. Multiple regression analyses were computed to determine relationships among study variables. Findings: Generally, participants were cognitively intact, experiencing high levels of spiritual well-being, satisfied with their social support, and mobile. However, psychosocial and physical FQOL scores were low. Regression analyses revealed unexpected variable influences on FQOL. Anxiety was most influencing on psychosocial FQOL. Spiritual well-being was influencing for male and female physical FQOL. Although 60 percent of the variance for physical FQOL of males was explained, only 17 percent of physical FQOL was explained for females. With the exception of education, there were no racial differences in predictors of FQOL. Conclusions: Quality of life is foremost a subjective phenomenon. The older adult&rsquo;s personal perspective is significant for measures of FQOL. Psychosocial indices strongly influence FQOL, particularly anxiety, depression, and spiritual well-being. Implications: This study lends strong support for screening for anxiety in addition to depression in the older adult and for promoting spiritual well-being to enhance FQOL. Instruments that solicit the client&rsquo;s opinion concerning daily functioning would provide a thorough and truthful picture of FQOL and better inform and direct interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:03:39Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:03:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.