2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156722
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Attitudes and Beliefs of Registered Nurses About Low-Income Expectant Women
Abstract:
Attitudes and Beliefs of Registered Nurses About Low-Income Expectant Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Smith, Tracey Jo, RNC, MS
P.I. Institution Name:Southern Illinois University School of Medicine
Title:Curriculum Development Specialists
Objective: Despite the trend to improve the availability/utilization of prenatal care for low-income women, there continues to be a low proportion of women receiving early/adequate prenatal care and a high rate of poor birth outcomes in the United States. Research indicates that healthcare providers' attitudes about low-income women affect utilization of prenatal care services. The purpose of this research was to explore the attitudes/beliefs of registered nurses toward low-income women presenting for prenatal care. Design: The Socio-Ecological Model of Determinants of Health Service Utilization (Sword, 1999) was used for this qualitative study to explore these attitudes/beliefs. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The target population was nursing personnel providing healthcare in prenatal clinics to low-income women. A convience sample of twelve registered nurses in three mid-western counties involved with prenatal care was interviewed over 6 months. Concept or Variables Studies Together or Intervention and Outcome Variable(s): Attitudes/beliefs of registered nurses Methods: Participants were interviewed using an investigator-developed tool. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. Responses were thematically grouped. Findings: Data revealed three themes: a) a difference in care standards, b) social/economic factors affect care, c) communication issues create many problems. Conclusions: The interrelationship among these themes is important for nurses to understand in an effort to weaken the barriers to prenatal care for low-income women. Implications: -Low-income women expecting less and providers providing less must be considered when planning interventions. -Failing to consider social and economic factors of recipients and providers decreases intervention success. -By individualizing care, being pro-active about pregnancy education,and using open-ended questions, nurses can help reduce the fear of the unknown of pregnancy. -Patient information received is crucial to the success of the system and providers must know how to link to interventions and when to share with all involved.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAttitudes and Beliefs of Registered Nurses About Low-Income Expectant Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156722-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Attitudes and Beliefs of Registered Nurses About Low-Income Expectant Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith, Tracey Jo, RNC, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southern Illinois University School of Medicine</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Curriculum Development Specialists</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tsmith@siumed.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Despite the trend to improve the availability/utilization of prenatal care for low-income women, there continues to be a low proportion of women receiving early/adequate prenatal care and a high rate of poor birth outcomes in the United States. Research indicates that healthcare providers' attitudes about low-income women affect utilization of prenatal care services. The purpose of this research was to explore the attitudes/beliefs of registered nurses toward low-income women presenting for prenatal care. Design: The Socio-Ecological Model of Determinants of Health Service Utilization (Sword, 1999) was used for this qualitative study to explore these attitudes/beliefs. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The target population was nursing personnel providing healthcare in prenatal clinics to low-income women. A convience sample of twelve registered nurses in three mid-western counties involved with prenatal care was interviewed over 6 months. Concept or Variables Studies Together or Intervention and Outcome Variable(s): Attitudes/beliefs of registered nurses Methods: Participants were interviewed using an investigator-developed tool. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. Responses were thematically grouped. Findings: Data revealed three themes: a) a difference in care standards, b) social/economic factors affect care, c) communication issues create many problems. Conclusions: The interrelationship among these themes is important for nurses to understand in an effort to weaken the barriers to prenatal care for low-income women. Implications: -Low-income women expecting less and providers providing less must be considered when planning interventions. -Failing to consider social and economic factors of recipients and providers decreases intervention success. -By individualizing care, being pro-active about pregnancy education,and using open-ended questions, nurses can help reduce the fear of the unknown of pregnancy. -Patient information received is crucial to the success of the system and providers must know how to link to interventions and when to share with all involved.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:04:08Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:04:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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