2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156731
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Work Environment and Nurse Characteristics on Nurse Outcomes
Abstract:
The Effect of Work Environment and Nurse Characteristics on Nurse Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Wang, Sping, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Toronto
Title:Research Associate
Co-Authors:Linda O'Brien-Pallas, RN, PhD; Donna Thomson, BScN, MScN; Linda McGillis Hall, RN, PhD; Xiaoqiang Li, PhD; Raquel M Meyer, RN, PhD, Student
Objective: This paper describes how inputs and throughputs in the PCDM influence nurse autonomy, relationships with physicians, satisfaction, burnout, SF-12 health status, and intent to leave. Design: Cross sectional and longitudinal. Population, Sample, Setting: In total, 727 nurses out of a possible 1107 completed the nurse survey. Concepts and variables measured: As described in Abstract 1 Results: Improved nurse-physician relationships were associated with higher proportions of physically healthy nurses and increases in RN worked hours on the unit. Deterioration in nurse-physician relationships was associated with P/U levels beyond 85%. Higher nurse autonomy was associated with P/U greater than 85% and nurse satisfaction. Job satisfaction was 57% less likely when P/U levels exceeded 80%. Nurses who rated the quality of nursing care as good or better, were 301% more likely to be satisfied. Improved job satisfaction was also 56% more likely for degree nurses and 24% more likely for every one point increase in their ratings of nurse autonomy. Emotional exhaustion was 66% less likely when nurses were satisfied and 32% less likely for every 10% increase in satisfied nurses on the unit. Emotional exhaustion was 242% more likely were at risk of an effort and reward imbalance and 179% more likely when nurses worked full-time. Intent to leave was 197% more likely amongst nurses who were concerned about job security and 101% more likely amongst degree nurses. Conclusion: Maintaining nurses’ physical health, promoting job security and designing jobs where degree prepared nurses can exercise full scope of practice will improve retention. Implication: The work environment is under the control of managers who can influence both patient and nurse outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Work Environment and Nurse Characteristics on Nurse Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156731-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Work Environment and Nurse Characteristics on Nurse Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wang, Sping, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Toronto</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Associate</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sping.wang@utoronto.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Linda O'Brien-Pallas, RN, PhD; Donna Thomson, BScN, MScN; Linda McGillis Hall, RN, PhD; Xiaoqiang Li, PhD; Raquel M Meyer, RN, PhD, Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: This paper describes how inputs and throughputs in the PCDM influence nurse autonomy, relationships with physicians, satisfaction, burnout, SF-12 health status, and intent to leave. Design: Cross sectional and longitudinal. Population, Sample, Setting: In total, 727 nurses out of a possible 1107 completed the nurse survey. Concepts and variables measured: As described in Abstract 1 Results: Improved nurse-physician relationships were associated with higher proportions of physically healthy nurses and increases in RN worked hours on the unit. Deterioration in nurse-physician relationships was associated with P/U levels beyond 85%. Higher nurse autonomy was associated with P/U greater than 85% and nurse satisfaction. Job satisfaction was 57% less likely when P/U levels exceeded 80%. Nurses who rated the quality of nursing care as good or better, were 301% more likely to be satisfied. Improved job satisfaction was also 56% more likely for degree nurses and 24% more likely for every one point increase in their ratings of nurse autonomy. Emotional exhaustion was 66% less likely when nurses were satisfied and 32% less likely for every 10% increase in satisfied nurses on the unit. Emotional exhaustion was 242% more likely were at risk of an effort and reward imbalance and 179% more likely when nurses worked full-time. Intent to leave was 197% more likely amongst nurses who were concerned about job security and 101% more likely amongst degree nurses. Conclusion: Maintaining nurses&rsquo; physical health, promoting job security and designing jobs where degree prepared nurses can exercise full scope of practice will improve retention. Implication: The work environment is under the control of managers who can influence both patient and nurse outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:04:43Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:04:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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