Understanding the Meaning of Mental Health and Illness in an Urban Nicaraguan Community: A Focused Mini-Ethnography

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156741
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding the Meaning of Mental Health and Illness in an Urban Nicaraguan Community: A Focused Mini-Ethnography
Abstract:
Understanding the Meaning of Mental Health and Illness in an Urban Nicaraguan Community: A Focused Mini-Ethnography
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Zoucha, Rick, APRN, DNSc, CTN
P.I. Institution Name:Duquesne University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Leah Vota Cunningham, RN, MNEd; Janet Gross, RN, DSN
Objective: The focus of this qualitative focused mini-ethnography research study was to discover the meaning of mental health and illness of residents of an urban Nicaraguan community. Design & Method: A small scale qualitative focused ethnography method was used for this study. The method included: observation-participation, writing and interpreting field notes, semi-structured interviews and focus groups were used to elicit an understanding of the meaning of mental health and illness from the unique cultural perspective of the informants. Leininger’s Four Phases of qualitative data analysis were used for this study: Collecting and documenting raw data; identification of descriptors and categories; identifying patterns and contextual analysis; identification of themes and theoretical formulations. Population: A voluntary sample of twenty female informants was included in the study. Five individual interviews and one focus group of nurses with a history of working in the community were conducted for inclusion for data analysis. The research site was Villa Libertad, a poor, high-risk barrio in Managua, Nicaragua. Research Questions: What are the cultural perceptions and meaning of mental health of residents of an urban Nicaraguan community? What are the cultural perceptions and meaning of mental health and illness of residents of an urban Nicaraguan community? Findings: The major theme uncovered was that mental health was viewed as the absence of psychopathology. Issues of depression, anxiety and stress were viewed as part of living and life and one was mentally healthy if they did not experience loss of reality or disturbed thoughts. Conclusion and Implications: The focus of this presentation will be to discuss the perceptions of mental health and illness in barrio Villa Libertad. Understanding mental health and illness from the unique cultural perspectives of this community is essential in promoting their mental health needs. Future suggested research includes a full scale focused ethnography.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding the Meaning of Mental Health and Illness in an Urban Nicaraguan Community: A Focused Mini-Ethnographyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156741-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Understanding the Meaning of Mental Health and Illness in an Urban Nicaraguan Community: A Focused Mini-Ethnography</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zoucha, Rick, APRN, DNSc, CTN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Duquesne University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">zoucha@duq.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Leah Vota Cunningham, RN, MNEd; Janet Gross, RN, DSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The focus of this qualitative focused mini-ethnography research study was to discover the meaning of mental health and illness of residents of an urban Nicaraguan community. Design &amp; Method: A small scale qualitative focused ethnography method was used for this study. The method included: observation-participation, writing and interpreting field notes, semi-structured interviews and focus groups were used to elicit an understanding of the meaning of mental health and illness from the unique cultural perspective of the informants. Leininger&rsquo;s Four Phases of qualitative data analysis were used for this study: Collecting and documenting raw data; identification of descriptors and categories; identifying patterns and contextual analysis; identification of themes and theoretical formulations. Population: A voluntary sample of twenty female informants was included in the study. Five individual interviews and one focus group of nurses with a history of working in the community were conducted for inclusion for data analysis. The research site was Villa Libertad, a poor, high-risk barrio in Managua, Nicaragua. Research Questions: What are the cultural perceptions and meaning of mental health of residents of an urban Nicaraguan community? What are the cultural perceptions and meaning of mental health and illness of residents of an urban Nicaraguan community? Findings: The major theme uncovered was that mental health was viewed as the absence of psychopathology. Issues of depression, anxiety and stress were viewed as part of living and life and one was mentally healthy if they did not experience loss of reality or disturbed thoughts. Conclusion and Implications: The focus of this presentation will be to discuss the perceptions of mental health and illness in barrio Villa Libertad. Understanding mental health and illness from the unique cultural perspectives of this community is essential in promoting their mental health needs. Future suggested research includes a full scale focused ethnography.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T15:05:19Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T15:05:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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